The Hungarian government took down the barbed wire on its border with Austria

The hungarian government took down the barbed wire on

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decade came to an end, much of the Eastern Bloc began to crumble. The Hungarian government took down the barbed wire on its border with Austria and the West. The Soviet Union did nothing in response. Although travel was still not completely free, the Iron Curtain was starting to unravel. On November 10, 1989, one of the most famous symbols of the Cold War came down: the Berlin Wall. By the end of the year, leaders of every Eastern European nation except Bulgaria had been ousted by popular uprisings. By mid-1990, many of the Soviet republics had declared their independence. Turmoil in the Soviet Union continued, as there were several attempts at overthrowing Gorbachev. On December 8, 1991, the Soviet Union ceased to exist. Boris Yeltsin,
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president of the Russian Republic, formed the Commonwealth of Independent States. After 45 years, the Cold War was over. 3. Using Wild Swans and BZS as your primary source of information, compare and contrast the role of women in China and the West since the turn of the century. Chang’s first book, the best-selling Wild Swans (1991), explored the history of 20th century China through the lives of three generations of women: her grandmother, mother, and herself. A portrait of traditional China is glimpsed through the life of the author’s grandmother, born in 1909. The binding of her feet, her experience as a concubine of General Xue, and her later marriage to Dr. Xia depict the social views and roles of women prior to the Communist Revolution. In contrast, the life of the author’s mother, born in 1931, reveals new avenues of mobility available to women of her generation: she is an ardent supporter of the new regime, a civil servant and the wife of a Communist official. Such a privileged position allows the author to grow up and receive an education during the 1960s in the midst of much social upheaval. Yet her fortune turns when her parents are convicted of being "enemies of the people," and she is sent, like many other urban youths of her generation, to the countryside to receive "re-education. Historically, women were treated as secondary or non-entity. Many women did not have names, and when they got married, they would be referred to by their own and their husband's last names. They had no legal rights. They did not go to school and a few lucky ones would learn how to read and write from their brothers or fathers. Confucius, who believed female obedience to men was one of the three cardinal principles of a society, decided the most obedient women were illiterate, hence women were not educated in literacy. Communism seemed to usher in a new society for China. In many ways, it did. Communism abolished polygamy, established gender equality and legitimated free love and marriage in its 1950 Marriage Law. Women were told they underwent in Communist China: as destruction of the past and creation of the future, as social liberation, as a process of class and gender unity, and as part of the proletariat class's liberation of itself from the shackles of a class society. Although gender identity existed, it was never encouraged and developed, and women,
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