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Basically states are responsible for designing their

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Basically, states are responsible for designing their own welfare programs and deciding who is eligible for help. A new block grant program called Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) replaces the old AFDC and other programs. The new law contains strong work requirements, a performance bonus to reward states for moving welfare recipients into jobs, state maintenance of effort requirements, comprehensive child support enforcement, and supports for families moving from welfare to work. Welfare recipients will have to work for benefits and face a limit on how long they can get help. (two years) Deadbeat parents will lose their drivers and professional licenses and be tracked down.
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9 ISS 225 Power, Authority, Exchange Poverty IV. Poverty and Powerlessness In 2000 the World Bank conducted a research study of 60,000 poor people from 60 countries around the world. The purpose of the study was to understand poverty from the perspective of poor people and to illuminate the human experience behind the poverty statistics. See http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/fandd/2000/12/narayan.htm One of the biggest findings of the study was that poor people's lives are characterized by powerlessness and voicelessness, which limit their choices and define the quality of their interactions with employers, markets, the state. The defining experiences of poor people involve highly limited choices and an inability to make themselves heard or to influence or control what happens to them. Powerlessness results from multiple, interlocking disadvantages, which, in combination, make it extremely difficult for poor people to escape poverty. By and large, poor people say that insecurity of life has increased and they have not been able to take advantage of new opportunities because of corruption and a lack of connections, assets, finance, information, and skills. Many poor people define poverty as the inability to exercise control over their lives. Limited resources force poor people to think in terms of very short time horizons. Poor people are often forced to make agonizing choices: feed the family or send children to school; buy medicine for a sick family member or feed the rest of the family; take a dangerous job or starve. Low self- confidence both results from poverty and increases powerlessness and isolation from opportunity.
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10 ISS 225 Power, Authority, Exchange Poverty 1. Livelihoods and Assets Precarious, seasonal, inadequate. The poor experience high unemployment rates. Those that are employed are not adequately employed – low paying, few benefits. 2. Places Isolated, risky, unserviced, stigmatized. The poor live in environments that have very poor resources. They are not as often connected to basic utilities. They tend to have higher crime rates. The environments are socially stigmatized (reputation). 3. Body Hungary, exhausted, sick, poor appearance. A poor person’s own self might be their only asset. However, they often suffer from poor health care, water, and sanitation. Health insurance is lacking for the poor, either nonexistent or inadequate. They can’t afford to keep up with personal appearance.
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