42 Tokyo Disney Resort What we are trying to do can be said to be a service

42 tokyo disney resort what we are trying to do can

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4.2 Tokyo Disney Resort “What we are trying to do can be said to be a ‘service industry’. Most important to this business is to be in line with the public interest and to make our guests happy. We must have that attitude to make this business a success. Just having the money and the facilities is not enough. We must put heart and soul into it as well. Sincerity, not academics or eloquence, is the key to moving the hearts of people.” —Masatamo Takahashi, President of Oriental Land Co., 1981 Tokyo Disney Resort is placed in Urayasu, just east of Tokyo. The Oriental Land Company started to contact with the executives in Disney Company about building a theme park in Japan. In July, they filed to Disney Company
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15 an “Oriental Land Feasibility Study Report 1974”. On December 3, 1980, the Tokyo Disneyland groundbreaking ceremony was held. The whole project cost about $1.5 billion during the construction process, which lasted two years and four months. TDL attracted many visitors, and it achieved 10 million visits on April 2, 1984(Figure 2). Then, Tokyo Disney Sea opened its gates on September 4, 2001 (Oriental Land Co, Ltd. creation period, 2010). The current price of one-day adult ticket of TDL is 6,900 ($58) while 4,500 ($38) for children. Both cases are Disney Theme Parks but they received pretty different results in terms of profits and attitudes from the society. The answer to the question what leads to such different outcomes lies in various aspects. In the next section, the thesis analyzes the difference between the two theme parks aiming to find out what are the key factors leading to the difference. The analysis is mainly from external aspect like market, environment, city construction and local culture, and also from internal aspect like finance, design and operation of the parks. The analysis presented in this thesis was synthesized from an extensive collection of published sources.
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16 Figure 2. Annual Attendance of Three Disney Theme Parks Source: 5. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS 5.1 External Factors Though theme parks aim to create a non-ordinary world for visitors, they are not utopians isolated from the world. On the contrary, theme parks rely on the region where they located to support their development. Thus, it is important to understand what is the background and general environment of the park. 5.1.1 Market As a business project, the profits of theme parks are in need of a good market. The condition of market includes regional economic level, competition in this business, policy of the local government and tourist market. 5.1.1.1 Regional Economy 0 5 10 15 20 1991 1995 2000 2005 2010 2013 Tokyo Disneyland Tokyo Disney Sea HKDL
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17 Better regional economic development is the foundation of higher incomes of people. With more money in hand, citizens can consider spend extra money on leisure like theme parks and more people will be able to afford the expenses. Thus, the healthy economy can contribute to the success of theme parks. The thesis uses GDP per capita to compare the regional economy of the two areas. The GDP per capita cannot directly equal to the revenue level
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