502 CHAPTER 18 Electric Currents FIGURE 182 A voltaic battery from Voltas

502 chapter 18 electric currents figure 182 a voltaic

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502 CHAPTER 18 Electric Currents FIGURE 18–2 A voltaic battery, from Volta’s original publication. FIGURE 18–1 Alessandro Volta. In this portrait, Volta demonstrates his battery to Napoleon in 1801. Volta’s most sensitive electroscope (Section 16 4) measured about 40 V per degree (angle of leaf separation). Nonetheless, he was able to estimate the potential differences produced by combina- tions of dissimilar metals in contact. For a silver zinc contact he got about 0.7 V, remarkably close to today’s value of 0.78 V.
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Electric Cells and Batteries A battery produces electricity by transforming chemical energy into electrical energy. Today a great variety of electric cells and batteries are available, from flashlight batteries to the storage battery of a car. The simplest batteries contain two plates or rods made of dissimilar metals (one can be carbon) called electrodes . The electrodes are immersed in a solution or paste, such as a dilute acid, called the electrolyte . Such a device is properly called an electric cell , and several cells connected together is a battery , although today even a single cell is called a battery. The chemical reactions involved in most electric cells are quite complicated. Here we describe how one very simple cell works, emphasizing the physical aspects. The cell shown in Fig. 18 3 uses dilute sulfuric acid as the electrolyte. One of the electrodes is made of carbon, the other of zinc. The part of each electrode outside the solution is called the terminal , and connections to wires and circuits are made here. The acid tends to dissolve the zinc electrode. Each zinc atom leaves two electrons behind on the electrode and enters the solution as a positive ion. The zinc electrode thus acquires a negative charge. The electrolyte becomes positively charged, and can pull electrons off the carbon electrode. Thus the carbon electrode becomes positively charged. Because there is an opposite charge on the two elec- trodes, there is a potential difference between the two terminals. In a cell whose terminals are not connected, only a small amount of the zinc is dissolved, for as the zinc electrode becomes increasingly negative, any new positive zinc ions produced are attracted back to the electrode. Thus, a particular potential difference (or voltage) is maintained between the two terminals. If charge is allowed to flow between the terminals, say, through a wire (or a lightbulb), then more zinc can be dissolved. After a time, one or the other electrode is used up and the cell becomes “dead.” The voltage that exists between the terminals of a battery depends on what the electrodes are made of and their relative ability to be dissolved or give up electrons. When two or more cells are connected so that the positive terminal of one is connected to the negative terminal of the next, they are said to be connected in series and their voltages add up. Thus, the voltage between the ends of two 1.5-V AA flashlight batteries connected in series is 3.0 V, whereas the six 2-V cells of an automobile storage battery give 12 V. Figure 18
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