The underlying assumption or the reason for the lack

This preview shows page 20 - 22 out of 111 pages.

We have textbook solutions for you!
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Economics: A Contemporary Introduction
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 22 / Exercise 5
Economics: A Contemporary Introduction
McEachern
Expert Verified
The underlying assumption, or the reason for the lack of change, has been that “the school as an institution was headed in the right direction except that it needed to exert more effort toward its previous goals and make content and instruction more palatable to students. It was taken for granted that there was nothing wrong in the schools and it was the student” and not the schools “that needed to be changed.” Although the research in education may be impressive in quantity, very few noticeable changes have resulted in schooling since our days as results. We are basically using the same instructional methods in the classroom that we were using fifty years ago, according to one observer. On the other hand, the changes and improvements in science, technology and medicine within the last five years have been impressive, and they have affected almost all of our lives in some way. We might expect educational aims and subject matter to change as society imposes new social and political demands on the schools, and as new knowledge is created. And they do! However, we should not expect the structure and organization of schools to change dramatically. This is why a teacher, after ten or twenty years of retirement, could, if he or she wanted, go back into the classroom and still be effective. We must understand that schools are highly bureaucratic and conservative (or traditional) institutions that operate with standardized norms of behavior, written rules and regulations, and well-defined tasks dispersed among administrators, teachers and students. As parents and/or teachers who were once students, we can return to school and readily cope and functions almost
We have textbook solutions for you!
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Economics: A Contemporary Introduction
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 22 / Exercise 5
Economics: A Contemporary Introduction
McEachern
Expert Verified
Tamil Nadu Teachers Education University, Chennai -97 21 immediately because the behaviors and tasks, the rituals, rules, and regulations, have not changed much since we were children. As teachers, curriculum specialists, administrators, and students interact on a daily basis in the operation of a school, a social order develops: A set of routines and rules surfaces and group norms and organizational values become pervasive and shape individual personalities and behavior. Hoy and Miskel describe this process: “The school is a system of social interaction; it is an organized whole comprised of interacting personalities bound together in an organic relationship. “The school is “characterized by an interdependence of parts, a clearly defined population differentiation from its environment, a complex network or social relationships, and its own unique culture.” The outcome is a host of institutional norms and patterns of behaviors that govern the interaction between teachers and students and between curriculum specialists and other support staff. Observers use terms like intrinsic character, institutional realities, or cultural patterns to describe these social characteristics and interactions.” When taken together they tend to result in a persuasive method of socializing and controlling the people who attend and/or work

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture