g a blank card a piece of felt For each syllable tap the sounds and place the

G a blank card a piece of felt for each syllable tap

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something concrete (e.g., a blank card, a piece of felt). For each syllable, tap the sounds and place the individual letters (letter tiles, letters on tag board, etc.) to represent the sounds on each syllable. USE DISCOVERY TO INTRODUCE SYLLABLE TYPES. Although direct instruction is critical for students, guiding them to discover certain concepts can be very effective. In the discovery method, the teacher is in control and guides the students to discover what the teacher wants. For example, after students have been taught the concept of a syllable (e.g., must contain a vowel) and have learned about closed syllables, students can be guided to discover other syllable types. For example, words of closed and a contrasting syllable pattern (e.g., vowel- consonant-e) are presented on cards and students analyze ways to categorize the words. Students are guided to discover that some of the words have a consonant after the vowel and
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some end in the letter e. Similar contrasts can be made between closed and open syllables. The main concept is always what impact these changes have on the sound of the vowel within the syllable. USE LETTER CARDS TO TEACH SYLLABLE DIVISION. After students are introduced to words of more than one syllable, they must be taught to recognize syllable patterns within words. In English, the key to syllable division is locating the vowel sounds and determining what comes after the vowel. This is often difficult for students and must be taught carefully with lots of practice. PRACTICE WITH DECODABLE TEXT. Once decoding skills have been taught, it is important that these skills be practiced until they have become automatic. For some students this requires tremendous amounts of practice - seeing words with particular patterns or letter-sound associations and pronouncing those words correctly. A major benefit of decodable materials is the decrease in “guessing” based on partial letter cues that poor readers so ofte n do. Practice with word lists is a first step but students also need practice with connected text. For readers with problems in decoding, reading decodable text (i.e., text that contains many words with the patterns/sounds taught plus a small set of irregular words) is a critical component of instruction. Instructional Strategies for Reading Irregular Words Instructional Strategies for Reading Irregular Words It is important that students, and their teachers, realize that most words (approximately 87%) in English follow regular orthographic patterns. Also, only parts of most irregular words are irregular; most commonly the vowels and silent letters in consonant combinations. Lists of frequently used words in English (such as the Dolch and Fry lists) contain both phonetically regular and irregular words. The regular words should be taught as part of the decoding curriculum (rather than memorized as sight words) and the truly irregular words should be taught separately using these suggested strategies: -Select a small set of irregular words for instruction. This should be guided by the words
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  • Fall '10
  • DAVISON
  • Vowel

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