And new product design control and also for analysis

This preview shows page 18 - 21 out of 34 pages.

and new product design control, and also for analysis to help top management decide policy, to
verify policy is being carried out and for solving problems in sales, personnel, labor management and in clerical departments. Quality Control Audits, internal as well as external, form part of this activity. To quote Ishikawa: "The results of these company-wide Quality Control activities are remarkable, not only in ensuring the quality of industrial products but also in their great contribution to the company’s overall business." Thus Ishikawa sees the Company -wide Quality Control movement as implying that quality does not only mean the quality of product, but also of after sales service, quality of management, the company itself and the human being. This has the effect that: Product quality is improved and becomes uniform. Defects are reduced. Reliability of goods is improved. Cost is reduced. Quantity of production is increased, and it becomes possible to make rational production schedules. Wasteful work and rework are reduced. Technique is established and improved. Expenses for inspection and testing are reduced. Contracts between vendor and vendee are rationalized. The sales market is enlarged. Better relationships are established between departments. False data and reports are reduced. Discussions are carried out more freely and democratically. Meetings are operated more smoothly. Repairs and installation of equipment and facilities are done more rationally. Human relations are improved. One major characteristic of Japanese Company-Wide Quality Control is the Quality Control Circle Movement started in 1962, with the first circle being registered with the Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Public Corporation. Starting in industry in Japan, these have now spread to banks and retailing, and been exported world-wide. Success in the West has not been
so extensive as in Japan, however, although even there have been limitations too. The nature and role of quality circles varies between companies. In Japan a quality circle is a typically voluntary group of some 5-10 workers from the same workshop, who meet regularly and are led by a foreman, assistant foreman, work leader or one of the workers. The aims of the quality circle activities are: To contribute to the improvement and development of the enterprise, To respect human relations and build a happy workshop offering job satisfaction, To deploy human capabilities fully and draw out infinite potential. These aims are broader than is consistent with a narrow definition of quality as often used in the West, and Circle activities reflect this. The members of the circle have mastered statistical quality control and related methods and all utilize them to achieve significant results in quality improvement, cost reduction, productivity and safety. The seven tools of quality control are taught to all employees: i) Pareto charts ii) Cause and effects diagrams iii) Stratification iv) Check sheets v) Histograms vi) Scatter diagrams vii)

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture