acquiring candida infections dt diminished levels of neutrophils Invasive

Acquiring candida infections dt diminished levels of

This preview shows page 14 - 17 out of 21 pages.

acquiring candida infections d/t diminished levels of neutrophils-Invasive candidiasis may also occur from indwelling catheters, IVs, peritoneal dialysis (direct access)-Complications: abscesses in the kidneys, brain, liver, shock DIC, death-Mycotoxicoses- ingestion of fungal toxins (Amanita mushroom produces hepatotoxins, wild mushroom that when eaten causes liver failure, problem in foreign countries, will require liver transplantation & dialysis to
Image of page 14
tachycardia), DIC, and death-Special adhesion factors- allows it to bind to implanted devices, epithelium, ECM, leukocytes, facilitates tissue invasion l.Evaluate the etiology, clinical manifestations and pathophysiology for influenza, measles, and HIV infection. Differentiate between the incubation, etiology, and modes of transmission for influenza, measles, and HIV infection and discuss the implications for clinical practice. Viral Infection Incubation Etiology Modes of Transmission Influenza Viral shedding= 3-5 days of infection (adults), 10 days (children) -Occurs in winter months -Incubation period 1-4 days Self-limiting, febrile viral illness of upper/lower respiratory system -High risk= very young, elderly, chronically ill, debilitated, immunocompromised -Single stranded RNA (3 types, A, B, C) -A & B- antigenic shifts > causes virus to mutate (transmitted through droplets, direct contact with infected hands/surfaces) - Antigenic drift d/t results in mutations, undergoes yearly change, not always protected against influenza the following year -Yearly vaccine- 2 Influenza A & 1 Influenza B subtypes Virus inhaled > neuraminidase (viral protein, on envelop) > degrades mucous layer of respiratory system > using hemagglutinin (viral protein, on envelop) > infects cells of the upper/lower respiratory system > necrosis of superficial respiratory cells and inflammation > leaving host susceptible to bacterial PNA -Neuraminidase also responsible for release of viruses from infected cells
Image of page 15
-Influenza A : Undergoes major antigenic changes- shifts occur in animals confected by a human and an avian strain of influenza- genoma becomes segmented and undergo recombination (virus obtains a new HA/NA antigen), previous protection may not exist -Influenza B : infects humans, mutates slower than A, reduced rate of antigenic changes Subtypes based on HA (16 forms) and NA (9 forms) antigens- infectious to birds and mammals Measles 6-19 days -Contagious is from 5 days before appearance of rash until 4 days after the rash has appeared Caused by virus rubeola, systemic infection causes immune suppression
Image of page 16
Image of page 17

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 21 pages?

  • Fall '15
  • david,mary

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture