2030s what do you expect you will have observed as

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2030s. What do you expect you will have observed as the most important ethical issues in theperiod under study? How do you expect individuals, social groups, and governments will haveresponded to these ethical issues? How do you think they should have responded?Before attempting to answer the questions identify the following aspects of the case: the majoragents in the case (patients, medical personnel, and others), the major facts of the case, themajor moral issue raised, how each agent responds to the moral issue in the case, the moralprinciples used by the agents to support their position on the issue, if stated.Now consider the following: what resolution would each of the moral principles (for example,autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice) in the case suggest? Are the principles inconflict? Do not worry if you do not feel confident about your suggested resolution since yourability to analyze and resolve cases will improve with practice and greater familiarity with theresources provided.Unit 9DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:1.Do you think there is a defensible moral difference between killing and letting die (orbetween action and omission)?2.Do you think there is a defensible moral difference between active voluntary euthanasiaand physician-assisted suicide?3.Which principle—mercy, autonomy, or justice—or which combination of principles doyou find most compelling in Battin’s argument in favour of active euthanasia andphysician-assisted suicide?4.Are you persuaded by Callahan’s argument that self-determination has “run amok”?5.Should we be concerned about the slippery slope from active voluntary to activeinvoluntary euthanasia?6.Do you agree with the Supreme Court decision against Sue Rodriguez? Why or why ornot?7.Do you think that active euthanasia can sometimes be preferable to passive euthanasia?8.If so, do you think active euthanasia should be permitted by Canadian law?Case Study 9.1. Active Euthanasia with Parental ConsentAndrea was a nine-year-old girl who had been diagnosed at the age of thirteen months ashaving cystic fibrosis. Since then she had been hospitalized twelve times; eight times during thelast year.
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When admitted for the last time she was already receiving an experimental antibiotic, whichwas being administered in an attempt to control a resistant pneumonia superimposed onseverely damaged lungs (a result of her underlying disease). She was at that time a severely ill,emaciated child with moderately laboured breathing. She seemed to have no interest in herenvironment and refused to communicate with anyone but her mother.Because of the severity of the child’s illness and because the parents had accurately perceivedthat the experimental antibiotic was a “last ditch” attempt to control her pulmonary infection,the physician discussed with the parents their perception of “extreme medical measure” andthe significance of a “no code” (or “Do Not Resuscitate”) order. The parents indicated that in theevent of a cardiac or respiratory arrest, they did not want their child to be resuscitated and theappropriate “no code” order was written. The child was not involved in these conversations orsubsequent decision-making, nor had the mother previously been able to answer herdaughter’s questions about death and dying.As the child’s condition continued to decline, the parents asked how much longer she would liveand how she would die. At one point the father said: “Watching your own child die is worsethan dying yourself.” This comment led to a discussion of active euthanasia utilizing intravenouspotassium chloride or a similar drug. The physicians pointed out that no matter how hopeless asituation or the amount of suffering that a patient and family were enduring, the law prohibitsthe active taking of a patient’s life. They refused to consider this option.

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Term
Fall
Professor
N/A
Tags
Ethics, moral principles, Vang Xiong, major moral issue
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Essentials of Psychology: Concepts and Applications
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Essentials of Psychology: Concepts and Applications
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