Unusual featuresspecial topics researchers hans

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Unusual features/special topics: Researchers: Hans Kummer, Larissa Swedell, Jane Phillips-Conroy, J-J Abegglen, C. Bachmann, H. Sigg, A. Stolba, W. Gotz
Gelada baboon Taxonomic classification: Cercopithecidae; Cercopithecinae; Theropithecus gelada Diet: mainly grass seeds Geographic location: East Africa (Simien Mountains, primarily) Social organization: multi-level society; the basic unit is the one-male-unit (OMU), which is composed of a few related females, an alpha male and possibly a follower male; a band is a clusteer of OMU's -- these bands are not as constant as those of hamadryas baboons, and OMU's can sometimes spend the day alone or visiting other bands; herds are temporary associations of bands at feeding sites Mating system: the alpha male of an OMU does all of the mating; females have clear estrous swellings Social behavior: females within an OMU are tightly bonded and remain together if the male dies; a follower male may try to steal away females who do not have close bonds with the alpha male; sometimes a male from an all-male group attacks an OMU and overthrows the alpha male, who may stay on as a follower male; the alpha male of an OMU is not the focus of the group (in contrast with hamadryas), but has grooming relations with one or two females; gelada OMU alpha males rarely interact Unusual features/special topics: they have a striking, brightly colored chest patch that changes color hormonally; Researchers: R. & P. Dunbar, Kawai, A. Mori, Peter Fashing, Nga Nguyen, Jacinta Beehner, Thore Bergman
Hanuman langur Taxonomic classification: Cercopithecidae; Colobinae; Semnopithecus (formerly Presbytis) entellus Diet: mainly leaves, some fruit Geographic location: Asia (e.g. India) Social organization: mainly one-male, multi-female groups ("harems"); all-male groups; sometimes multi-male, multi-female groups; female philopatry, male transfer Mating system: polygyny is most common Social behavior: males commit infanticide during takeovers of breeding groups; frequent allomaternal interactions; age-graded dominance (older females are lower ranking) Unusual features/special topics: flamboyant neonatal coats (these apparently make the infant attractive to allomothers); the function of infanticide in this species is hotly debated. Researchers: P. (Jay) Dolhinow, S. Hrdy, V. Sommer, Newton, C. Borries, A. Srivastava
red colobus monkeys Taxonomic classification: Cercopithecidae; Colobinae; Procolobus ( formerly Colobus) badius Diet: mainly leaves, also fruit (preferably unripe) and seeds Geographic location: African forests Social organization: large groups (about 50 individuals): multi-male, multi- female; in poorer habitats, small one-male groups may occur; male philopatry (with occasional transfer), female transfer; Mating system: usually promiscuous; infanticide may occur as a male reproductive strategy; females have postconception estruses and mate with infanticidal males during these periods Social behavior: males cooperate in defense against predation (particularly against chimpanzees) and occasionally against males of other groups; males

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