The imperial court was moved to the shoguns palace in the center of the city

The imperial court was moved to the shoguns palace in

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The imperial court was moved to the shogun’s palace in the center of the city. Transformation of Politics The new leaders moved to abolish the old order and to strengthen power in their hands. The new leaders stripped the daimyos of the titles to their lands in 1871 to undercut their power.
Section 3 – Rise of Modern Japan 16:10 The lords were given government bonds and were named governors of the territories formerly under their control. The territories were now called prefectures. The Meiji reformers set out to create a modern political system based on the Western model. In 1868, the new leaders signed a Charter Oath, in which they promised to create a new legislative assembly within the framework of continued imperial rule. The modernizing leaders from the Sat-Cho group held the key posts although the daimyo were given senior positions in the new government. The country was divided into 75 prefectures. During the next 20 years, the Meiji government undertook a careful study of Western political systems. A commission under Ito Hirobumi traveled to Great Britain, France, Germany, and the United States to study their governments. Two main factions appeared, the Liberals and the Progressives as the process evolved. The Liberals wanted political reform based on the Western liberal democratic model, which vested supreme authority in the parliament as the representative of the people. The Progressives wanted power to be shared between the legislative and executive branches, with the executive branch having more control. During the 1870s and 1880, these factions fought for control. In the end, the Progressives won. The Meiji constitution, adopted in 1880, was modeled after that of Imperial Germany. Most authority was given to the executive branch. In theory, the emperor exercised all executive authority, but in practice he was a figurehead. Real executive authority rested in the hands of a prime minister and his cabinet of ministers. A western-style bicameral bureaucracy The Meiji leaders handpicked these ministers. Under the new constitution, the upper house included royal appointments and elected nobles, while the lower house was elected. The two houses were to have equal legislative powers.
Section 3 – Rise of Modern Japan 16:10 The final result was a political system that was democratic in form but authoritarian in practice. Although modern in eternal appearance, it was still traditional because power remained in the hands of a ruling oligarchy. Although a new set of institutions and values had emerged, the system allowed the traditional ruling class to keep its influence and economic power. Meiji Economics The Meiji leaders also set up a land reform program, which made the traditional lands of the daimyo into the private property of the peasants. The Meiji leaders then levied a new land tax, which was set at an annual rate of three percent of the estimated value of the land.

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