Virtues in the near and distant futures differently

This preview shows page 11 - 14 out of 38 pages.

virtues in the near and distant futures differently than a consumer in the need-recognition stage (Trope and Liberman 2003). By considering these elements in combination, marketers can predict temporal changes in consumers’ advertising responses better and thereby capture more value from consumers. For example, Luo et al. (2014a) demonstrate that same-day mobile push coupons work best for consumers who are nearby, whereas next-day coupons function better when consumers are more distant from the provider. However, the question of optimizing mobile advertising placements remains open. For example, when consumers are engaged in multiple tasks (e.g., checking their Facebook feed and
12 considering advertisements for related products), if the primary task (engaging with Facebook) induces high arousal, it can lead to cognitive depletion that impairs their performance on the secondary task (processing a mobile ad) (Eysenck 1982; Fedorikhin and Patrick 2010). In terms of both brand recall and attitudinal measures, the impact of a mobile advertisement can suffer when the prospective consumer is engaged in performing a task that triggers more arousal. Prior research mostly treats arousal as a generalized antecedent to attention (MacInnis and Jaworski 1989; Petty and Cacioppo 1986), but separating and experimentally identifying the interaction of these two constructs could provide an opportunity for studying the persuasiveness of mobile display ads. For example, literature that reveals behavioral consequences of affect (Andrade 2005; Rook and Gardner 1993) identifies conditions that may account for the weak impact of display advertising in dual-task settings (Pham 1992), such as when high involvement with the advertising channel lowers subsequent recognition of the advertised brand. The example of a consumer who browses a Facebook feed and gets exposed to advertisements at the same time also suggests the need to consider network effects. Some consumers may be influenced by information about others’ decisions, and word-of-mouth (WOM) communications tend to exert more powerful influences on consumer decisions than firm-initiated communication (Herr, Kardes, and Kim 1991; Mahajan, Muller, and Wind 2000). The emergence of sophisticated customer interaction databases that feature mobile communication, instant messaging, and social network data allow marketers to study WOM processes at the micro level (Nitzan and Libai 2011). For example, Nielsen is adding Twitter- and mobile-linked measures of popularity to its traditional television ratings (Sharma and Vranica 2013). Related network literature (Aral, Muchnik, and Sundararajan 2009; Katona, Zubcsek, and Sarvary 2011) seeks to quantify interpersonal influences using social network data.
13 Further investigations have suggested ways to monetize this information, using either targeted (Aral, Muchnik, and Sundararajan 2013; Goel and Goldstein 2014) or untargeted (Zubcsek, Phan, and Lu 2015) advertising.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture