this projection period the average growth rate of energy consumption in the non

This projection period the average growth rate of

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this projection period, the average growth rate of energy consumption in the non-OECD countries is triples that of the OECD countries. When comparing different regions of non-OECD countries, from the same table, it is obvious that Asia constitutes the largest portion, about 54% of the energy consumption. Also, in terms of growth rate, it is 3.7% p.a., the highest among all the regions. From the above Table 2, it was found that developing countries are consuming more energy, while among the developing countries; the Asia region consumes the most. The following Table 3 presents the comparison of energy consumption patterns for G8 developed countries and Southeast Asian developing countries. In terms of per capita energy consumption, the values of developed countries are very much higher than the developing countries. Whilst among the developing countries, the per capita energy consumption of Malaysia is 106.3 million Btu, this is comparatively high compared to the other Southeast Asian countries (except Brunei and Singapore) that have generally lower than 60 million Btu. Table 3: Comparison of energy consumption pattern in selected countries, 2005 Primary energy consumption Country Per capita (million Btu) Energy intensity (Btu per 2000 US$) G8 countries Canada 436.2 13,825 France 181.5 7,243 Germany 176.0 7,021 Italy 138.9 5,788 Japan 177.0 6,539 Russia 212.2 14,935 United Kingdom 165.7 6,048 United States 340.5 9,113 Southeast Asian countries Brunei 314.4 17,952 Cambodia 0.6 302 Indonesia 23.4 5,839 Malaysia 106.3 9,253 Myanmar 5.4 1764 Philippines 15.2 4,865 Singapore 457.1 15,444 Thailand 56.5 6,848 Vietnam 14.7 4,857 Source: EIA, 2007
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9 In terms of energy intensity, by comparison the energy intensities of the developed countries are also generally higher than the developing countries, particularly in the case of Canada and Russia. Similarly, among the developing countries, it can be seen that the energy intensity of Malaysia is obviously higher than other developing countries, and in fact it is higher than quite a number of developed countries. (f) Energy consumption by sources The EIA (2001) report on the energy consumption by source in 2001 is as shown in Table 4 It indicates that the Malaysia is still very dependent on non renewable sources of energy. Biomass and hydro electricity generation constitute only about 5% of the total energy production. Table 4: Energy Consumption by source in Malaysia Energy Source Percentage Total energy (‘000 metric ton) Coal 4.0 Oil 50.1 Natural gas 40.1 Hydro electric 1.2 Biomass 4.7 Total 100 Total production =77, 623 Total consumption 51,608 Table 5 shows that the final commercial energy demand increased at the rate of about 6% p.a. from 11244 PJ in year 2000 to 2217.9 PJ in 2010. In line with the Government policy of Fuel diversification, the share of demand on petroleum products will continue to decline while that the natural gas will increase. Table 5 Final commercial energy demand by sector, Malaysia Energy consumption (PJ) Growth rate (% p.a.) Sources 2000 (%) 2005 (%) 2010 (%) 2000-05 2005-10 Petroleum Products 820.0 (65.9%) 1023.1 (62.7%) 1372.9 (61.9%) 4.5 6.1 Natural gases 161.8 (13.0%) 246.6 (15.1%) 350.0 (15.8%) 8.8 7.3 Electricity 220.4 (17.7%) 310.0 (19.0%) 420.0 (18.9%) 7.1 6.3 Coal and Coke 41.5 (3.4%) 52.0 (3.2%) 75 (3.4%) 4.6 7.6 Total 1243.7 1631.7 2217.9 5.6 6.3 Per capital consumption 52.9 62.2 76.5 3.3 4.2
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