For example if the training intensity requires a

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For example, if the training intensity requires a heart rate between 150 and 170 bpm, the person may associate this with training between “hard” and “very hard.” Some individuals perceive less exertion P R I N C I P L E S & L A B S 164 Recommended cardiorespiratory or aerobic training pattern. Figure 6.6 85% HRR* 60% HRR* 50% HRR* 40% HRR* Time (minutes) 200 180 147 134 121 100 80 60 Heart rate (beats/min) 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 Age 20 MHR 200 RHR 68 *HRR = Heart rate reserve Resting heart rate Cool- down phase Warm-up phase Maximal heart rate High-intensity training zone Moderate-intensity training zone Low-intensity training zone A E R O B I C P H A S E
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than others when training in the correct zone. Therefore, you have to associate your own inner perception of the task with the phrases given on the scale. You then may proceed to exercise at that rate of perceived exertion. The numbers on the scale can also be used in reference to exercise heart rates. If you multiply each number by 10, it will approximate the exercise heart rate at the perceived exertion phase. For ex- ample, when you are exercising “somewhat hard,” your heart rate will be around 130 bpm (13 10). When you exercise “hard,” the heart rate will be about 150 bpm. You must be sure to cross-check your actual target zone with your perceived exertion during the first weeks of your exercise program. To help you develop this association, you should regularly keep a record of your activities using the form provided in Figure 6.10 (pages 173 and 174). After several weeks of training, you should be able to predict your exercise heart rate just by your own perceived exertion of the intensity of exercise. Whether you monitor the intensity of exercise by checking your pulse or through rate of perceived exertion, you should be aware that changes in normal exercise conditions will affect the training zone. For example, exercising on a hot, humid day or at high altitude increases the heart rate response to a given task, requiring adjustments in the inten- sity of your exercise. Mode of Exercise The mode of exercise that develops the cardiorespi- ratory system has to be aerobic in nature. Once you have established your cardiorespiratory training zone, any activity or combination of activities that will get your heart rate up to that training zone and keep it there for as long as you exercise will give you adequate development. Examples of these activities are walking, jogging, aerobics, swimming, water aerobics, cross-country skiing, rope skipping, cycling, racquetball, stair climbing, and stationary running or cycling. Aerobic exercise has to involve the major muscle groups of the body, and it has to be rhythmic and continuous. As the amount of muscle mass involved during exercise increases, so does the resulting cardiorespiratory development. The activity you choose should be based on your personal prefer- ences, what you most enjoy doing, and your physi- cal limitations.
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  • Fall '19
  • heart rate, Aerobic exercise

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