In the densely populated civilizations of china the

This preview shows page 26 - 28 out of 48 pages.

We have textbook solutions for you!
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Essentials of Human Development: A Life-Span View
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 10 / Exercise 01
Essentials of Human Development: A Life-Span View
Cavanaugh/Kail
Expert Verified
In the densely populated civilizations of China, the Islamic world,and Europe as well as in the steppe lands of the nomads, the plague claimed enormous num- bers of human victims,causing a sharp contraction in Eurasian population for a century or more. Chron- iclers reported rates of death that ranged from 50 to 90 percent of the affected population, depending on the time and place.A recent study suggests that about half of Europe’s people perished during the initial out- break of 1348 1350 . 31 A fifteenth-century Egyptian historian wrote that within a month of the plague’s arrival in 1349 , “Cairo had become an abandoned desert .... Everywhere one heard lamentations and one could not pass by any house without being over- whelmed by the howling.” 32 The Middle East gen- erally had lost perhaps one-third of its population by the early fifteenth century. 33 The intense first wave of the plague was followed by periodic visitations over the next several centuries, although India and sub- Saharan Africa were much less affected than other regions of the eastern hemisphere. But in those places where it struck, the plague left thoughtful people grasping for language with which to describe a horror of such unprecedented dimensions.One Italian man,who had buried all five of his children with his own hands, wrote in 1348 that “so many have died that everyone believes it is the end of the world.” 34 Another Italian,the Renaissance 545 chapter 12 / pastoral peoples on the global stage: the mongol moment, 1200–1500 Change Disease changes societies. How might this argument apply to the plague? The Plague This illustration depicts a European doctor visiting a patient with the plague. Notice that the doctor and others around the bedside cover their noses to prevent infection. During the Black Death, doctors were often criticized for refusing to treat dying patients, as they feared for their own lives. (The Granger Collection, New York)
We have textbook solutions for you!
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Essentials of Human Development: A Life-Span View
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 10 / Exercise 01
Essentials of Human Development: A Life-Span View
Cavanaugh/Kail
Expert Verified
scholar Francesco Petrarch, was equally stunned by the impact of the Black Death; he wrote to a friend in 1349 : When at any time has such a thing been seen or spoken of? Has what happened in these years ever been read about: empty houses, derelict cities, ruined estates, fields strewn with cadavers,a horrible and vast solitude encompassing the whole world? Consult historians, they are silent; ask physicians, they are stupefied; seek the answers from philosophers,they shrug their shoulders,furrow their brows,and with fingers pressed against their lips, bid you be silent.Will posterity believe these things, when we who have seen it can scarcely believe it...? 35 In the Islamic world, the famous historian Ibn Khaldun, who had lost both of his parents to the plague, also wrote about it in apocalyptic terms: Civilization in both the East and the West was visited by a destructive plague which devastated nations and caused populations to vanish.It swallowed up many of the good things of civilization and wiped them out .... It was as if the voice of

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture