The pro life world view notwithstanding the occasional atheist or agnostic

The pro life world view notwithstanding the

This preview shows page 206 - 208 out of 348 pages.

The pro-life world view, notwithstanding the occasional atheist or agnostic attracted to it, is at the core one that centers around God: pro-life activ- ists are on the whole deeply committed to their religious faith and deeply involved with it. A number of important consequences follow. Because most pro-life people have a deep faith in God, they also believe in the Tightness of His plan for the world. They are therefore skeptical about the ability of individual humans to understand, much less control, events that unfold according to a divine, rather than hu- man, blueprint. From their point of view, human attempts at control are simply arrogance, an unwillingness to admit that larger forces than human will determine human fate. One woman made the point clearly: "God is the Creator of life, and I think all sexual activity should be open to that [creation]. That does not mean that you have to have a certain number of children or anything, but it should be open to Him and His will. The contraceptive mentality denies his will, 'It's my will, not your will.' And here again, the selfishness comes in." This comment grew out of a discussion on contraception, but it also reveals values about human efficacy and its role in a larger world. While individuals can and should control their lives, pro-life people believe they should do so with a humility that understands that a force greater than themselves exists and, furthermore, that unpredicted things can be valuable. A woman who lost two children early in life to a rare genetic defect makes the point: "I didn't plan my son, my third child, and only because I was rather frightened that I might have a problem with another child. But I was certainly delighted when I be- came pregnant andhad him. That's what I mean, I guess I feel that you
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WORLD VIEWS OF THE ACTIVISTS 187 can't plan everything in life. Some of the nicest things that have hap- pened to me have certainly been the unplanned." Another woman went further: "I think people are foolish to worry about things in the future. The future takes care of itself." Consequently, from the pro-life point of view, the contemporary movement away from the religious stand, what they see as the "secu- larization" of society, is at least one part of the troubles of contempo- rary society. By this they mean at least two things. First, there is the decline in religious commitment, which they feel keenly. But, second, they are also talking about a decline of a common community, a collec- tive sense of what is right and wrong. From their viewpoint, once mo- rality is no longer codified in some central set of rules that all accept and that finds its ultimate justification in the belief in a Supreme Being, then morality becomes a variation of "do your own thing." For pro-life people, once the belief in a Supreme Being (and by definition a common sense of culture) is lost, a set of consequences emerge that not only creates abortion per se but creates a climate where phenomena such as abortion can flourish.
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