2 misconduct it is essential to apply the notions of the self control theory

2 misconduct it is essential to apply the notions of

This preview shows page 3 - 5 out of 6 pages.

2 misconduct, it is essential to apply the notions of the self-control theory. Gottfredson and Hirschi's original theory was based on the notion that criminal behavior on the side of police officers emanates from self-control issues. To understand police misconduct, therefore, it is essential to apply the notion of self-control. The original theory, however, faced great scrutiny, especially due to its shortfalls in measuring self-control. It was, therefore, later revised to address these shortfalls. The revised version of the theory took into consideration the social factors that might affect a police officer's self-control and make him/her to engage in police misconduct. When determining the cost of offending at a given moment, the social bonds need to be considered. Similarly, the same applies in the case of police misconduct. Officers within any given police department have a culture within which they operate that makes them feel like they have to behave in a certain way to generate a sense of belonging with their peers or fellow police officers. This, therefore, makes it challenging for good officers to abide by the regulations and maintain the standards of law enforcement when their partners or colleagues are engaging in police misconduct (Schulz, 2004). The findings of the study were consistent with both the original and the revised theories of self- control, while they also help the police leadership to enforce law enforcement standards and policies and limit the prevalence of police deviance or misconduct while rebuilding the relationship between the police and the community. References Donner, C. M., Fridell, L. A., & Jennings, W. G. (2016). The Relationship Between Self-Control and Police Misconduct. Criminal Justice and Behavior , 43 (7), 841-862. doi:10.1177/0093854815626751
Image of page 3
3 Donner, C. M., & Jennings, W. G. (2014). Low Self-Control and Police Deviance: Applying Gottfredson and Hirschi’s General Theory to Officer Misconduct. Police Quarterly , 17 (3), 203-225. doi:10.1177/1098611114535217 Schulz, S. (2004). Problems with the Versatility Construct of Gottfredson and Hirschi's General Theory of Crime. European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice , 12 (1), 61-82. doi:10.1163/1571817041268856
Image of page 4
Image of page 5

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 6 pages?

  • Winter '18
  • Salome Vejar
  • Wit, Police Quarterly

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture