25 Incentive programs are drastically different from pay-for-performance programs 26 Stress-reduction programs demonstrate management\u2019s interest in

25 incentive programs are drastically different from

This preview shows page 51 - 53 out of 61 pages.

3. The _______ budget is a projection of cash balance at the end of each month throughout the  budget year. a. capital c. incremental b. revenue and expense d. cash 4. _______ budgeting is the practice of involving operating unit managers and supervisors in the  development of forecasts of expenditures and revenues for their respective units. a. Cash c. Incremental b. Grassroots d. Capital Questions 5–18: Indicate whether each statement is True or False. ______ 5. Controlling is the process of giving directives. ______ 6. Controlling is most closely related to the planning function. ______ 7. The purpose of the controlling process is to ensure that performance is consistent with plans and that plans and standards are being followed. ______ 8. Controlling is one of the preparatory steps for the work to get done. ______ 9. E-mail fuels the grapevine. (Continued) Health Care Management50 Self-Check 8 ______ 10. Anticipatory control is a mechanism that alerts the user to discrepancies after a process is completed. ______ 11. Benchmarking establishes goals by comparing performance to others. ______ 12. Observation can’t be used as a technique for measurement. ______ 13. Benchmarking is the process of seeking best practices so that the organization remains competitive in the marketplace. ______ 14. Budgeting isn’t a planning function but an administrative function. ______ 15. Budgetary control refers to the use of budgets to control the department’s daily  operations. ______ 16. What-if analysis manipulates variables in a budget to see how the results change.
Image of page 51
______ 17. A date isn’t needed in a budget. ______ 18. When preparing a budget, a manager must locate internal competition for funds. Check your answers with those on page 65. ASSIGNMENT 9—LABOR RELATIONS Read this introduction, then read Chapters 27–29 in your  text- book, Health Care Management. The Labor Union and the Supervisor The nature of the job means that managers have the most contact with the unions. The supervisors  deal with the union- ized employees, and the managers make the decisions that Lesson 4 51 affect the employees. Managers must accept and respect the employees’ decision and right to join  the union. Labor laws dictate things that managers can and can’t do during union organizing. For  example, managers can’t interrogate employees to find out whether they’re for or against the union.  They also can’t threaten, coerce, or intimidate any employee because of union activity. It’s important  to avoid saying anything that might be construed as an attempt to circumvent this rule. Managers  can tell employees that the organization doesn’t believe that they need union representation. A list of do’s and don’ts for managers appears on page 636 of your textbook. Regardless of whether their employees are in the union or not, managers should continue to strive to be effective leaders. They should continue to give clear and reasonable directives and keep morale  high amongst staff. They should keep employee files up to date, including any disciplinary actions  taken against employees, as that information may be needed during union negotiations and  grievances.
Image of page 52
Image of page 53

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture