Avoid wearing unusual clothes or jewelry that might

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Fundamentals of Logic Design
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Chapter 5 / Exercise 5.46
Fundamentals of Logic Design
Kinney/Roth
Expert Verified
Avoid wearing unusual clothes or jewelry that might distract the audience or get in your way as you speak. Stand up straight but in a relaxe4d manner. Don’t slouch or lean on the podium, if yo0u’re using one. Try to keep a pleasant expression on your face. As you speak, keep eye contact with your audience. Don’t look up at the ceiling or down at the floor. If you’re reading from a manuscript, hold it up slightly so that you can easily glance at the audience from time to time. Gestures can help emphasize important parts of your speech. But don’t overdo them. If you gesture constantly, you’ll lessen the effect and make the audience more aware of your gestures than your words. And make sure your gestures look natural and blend smoothly with what you’re saying. Audio – visual aids: can enliven your presentation. Such aids include drawings, photographs, maps, charts, graphs, diagrams, chalkboards, models, slides, films, records, tape recordings and videotapes. Audio-visual aids can add welcome variety to your speech and help hold the audience’s attention. They can enable the audience to understand exactly what you mean. They can also make your speech more memorable by leaving the audience with a more vivid impression of your topic than words alone can convey. Rehearse with your audio-visual aids so you can incorporate them smoothly into your speech. Here’s a list of points to remember when using audio-visual aids:
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Fundamentals of Logic Design
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Chapter 5 / Exercise 5.46
Fundamentals of Logic Design
Kinney/Roth
Expert Verified
Communication Process Course-102 67 1. Have them set up and ready to use before your speech. If an aid is particularly interesting or unusual , it may be good idea to have the aid handy, but hidden, until the appropriate time in your speech. Other-wise, your audience may be too distracted to pay close attention to the earlier parts of your speech. 2. Mount illustrations and set them up on an easel, rather then trying to hold them while speaking. 3. If you’re going to write on a chalkboard or paper, remember to keep turning back to your listeners to keep your eye contact with them. 4. If you’ll be using such equipment as a film or overhead projector or a tape or videotape recorder, be sure it’s in good working order and that an electrical outlet is nearby. 5. Don’t pass a visual aid around during your speech. It’s too distracting. If you have material to pass out, do it before or after your speech. 6. Don’t stand in front of a visual aid or block the view of part of the audience. 7. Remember to talk to the audience, not to the aid. Stage fright: When the time finally comes to deliver your speech, you’ll probably suffer from that common ailment – stage fright. To keep your nervousness from working against you, concentrate on what the person speaking before you is saying, rather than worrying about your own presentation.

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