logos ethos and pathos do not need to appear in your rhetorical analysis If you

Logos ethos and pathos do not need to appear in your

This preview shows page 12 - 14 out of 32 pages.

logos, ethos, and pathos do not need to appear in your rhetorical analysis. If you are writ- ing for readers who probably don’t know what these terms mean, you are better off using words like “reasoning,” “credibility,” or “emotion.” If you want to use the actual rhetorical terms, make sure you define them for readers. Designing your rhetorical analysis Computers make it possible to use visuals in a rhetorical analysis. You can download pictures from the Internet, use a scanner to insert an image of the text, or take a picture with a digital camera. You could even include a video or audio podcast, so your readers can experience the text you are analyzing. Here are some things you might try out: DOWNLOAD IMAGES FROM THE INTERNET If you are reviewing a book or a historical docu- ment, you could download an image of its cover and include that image in your rhetorical analysis. 000200010270568399_CH05_p086-117.pdf:000200010270568399_CH05_p086-117.pdf 11/5/10 3:17 PM Page 98
Image of page 12
99 REVISING AND EDITING YOUR RHETORICAL ANALYSIS That way, readers can actually see what you aretalking about.ADD A SCREEN SHOTIf you are writing about an advertisement fromthe Internet, you can take a picture of your screen“Red Bull Gives You Wings”Energy drinks are a product that relies heavily on emotion for sales to high school and college students. These soft drinks, which usually contain high amounts of caffeine and calories, began to grow in popularity in the late 1990’s. Red Bull, one of the most popular brands, actually was invented in the 1970s in Thailand, and it was first exposed to the United States in 1997 (Fundinel University). From the beginning, its advertising has been squarely aimed at college students, telling them that they need to have extra energy to get through their hectic days. It’s current version of the “Red Bull Gives You Wings” slogan began in 2005 with simple hand-drawn movies like the one shown in Figure 1.Fig. 1. “Red Bull Gives You Wings.”In this advertisement, a bird relieves himself on a man who looks a lot like a professor. The man then drinks a Red Bull and sprouts wings. He flies above the bird, undoes his pants, and proceeds to return the favor offscreen.The viewer hears the bird screech in horror as a can of Red Bull fills the screen, but we can all imagine what happened.During the span of 30-second advertisement, the man transforms from being a seemingly weak victim to a superheroicfigure that can take vengeance on the bird. The experience of drinking of Red Bull is shown to be the moment that gives him this new power.FIGURE5.3Adding a Screen Shot to YourAnalysisA screen shot is an easy way to put an image into yourrhetorical analysis.Revising and editing your rhetorical analysisRhetorical analyses tend to be medium-sized docu-ments, so they are easy to revise and edit. One ofthe challenges of editing a rhetorical analysis iskeeping your definitions of key terms consistentthroughout the argument. If you aren’t careful,your definitions of rhetorical concepts will evolveas you analyze a text. So you want to make sureyou are using your terms consistently.
Image of page 13
Image of page 14

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 32 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture