Literacy in the 21st Century Being literate in the future will certainly

Literacy in the 21st century being literate in the

This preview shows page 76 - 78 out of 201 pages.

Literacy in the 21st Century Being literate in the future will certainly involve the ability to read, write, and do basic math. However, the concept of literacy in the 21st Century will be far richer and more comprehensive than the education you and I received growing up (Warlick, 2003). The very nature of information is changing: how we organized, where we find it, what we use to view it, what we do with it, and how we communicate it. Will Richardson (2006) in his book Blogs, Wikis, Podcasts, and Other Powerful Web Tools for Classrooms , talks about the transformational nature of these pervasive technology tools, especially in terms of their ability to nurture connections and collaborations: "Whether it's blogs or wikis or RSS, all roads now point to a Web where little is done in isolation and all things are collaborative and social in nature." The most prevalent change in how we use the Internet in the 21st Century is not as much in the ability to publish information as it is the ability to share and connect with others from around the globe. The social web: Learning together Today's read/write web technologies have the power to create informal peer-to-peer social connections and to open new avenues for learning environments that go beyond those that are linear, teacher-centered and lecture-based to ones that are divergent, dynamic, student-centered, constructive, and communication-rich. A passionate student is a learning student. As the people of the world are becoming increasingly connected, the nature, use, ownership, and purpose of knowledge are changing in profound ways. Our goal as educators is to leverage these connections and changes as a powerful means to improve teaching and learning in our schools. We have a changing demographic in our classrooms and by networking together with individuals from around the world we are building capacity in our students and ourselves to understand multiple viewpoints and perspectives. And by using digital media and web-based tools, students can build their own learning experiences, construct meaning, and collaborate in teams to solve authentic content-based problems. Many teachers who use these empowering technologies are now discovering we can have rigor without sacrificing excitement. The secret: Focus on student passion and interest, not machines and software. Today's digital natives are passionate about team-based learning approaches because of their vast digital gaming experiences. It feels natural for them to learn by collaborating online with others they have never met. Unit 2 - Page 76
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Developing an effective learning environment in the 21st Century requires drawing on a wide range of teaching concepts, methods, strategies, and technologies. For example, building a rich environment for inquiry involves an understanding of literacy, of problem- and project-based learning, of critical and creative thinking skills, of problem solving techniques and constructivist learning theory. Allowing students to work in teams both in
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  • Fall '10
  • JamesYoung
  • Educational Psychology, 21st century, Learning Guide, Learning Sciences International

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