Notes for hypertrophy phase breaking this template

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Notes for Hypertrophy Phase Breaking this template down even further is this simple: On lower body day, follow up your main work with a big leg movement and a big “deadlift-like” movement. On upper body day, follow up the main pressing movement, (whether it be the press or the bench press) with the OPPOSITE movement. For example, after you bench press, you will use the press for the volume work. After the main work is done, you are free to do anything you desire. This can include any additional work for injury prevention or any work that is simply cosmetic. This could include curls, neck work, rotator cuff, upper back, abdominal, etc. This is up to you and is not programmed as it is simply GPP work for the competitive lifter. Push the final sets of your 5/3/1 work hard. The main purpose of this phase is to train using semi-heavy weights and up the volume of your assistance work. I work with many older lifters and I let them dictate how hard they want to push their final sets. In place of the final sets, I have many of the lifters do a heavy single after their final sets, even during this phase. Personally, I almost always hit a heavy set after each and every workout. You can use the Joker sets for this part of the training.
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Hypertrophy Phase Changes – Bad Knees If you find that the volume of the lower body work is too much for your knees, back or your overall body, LOWER IT! This can be as simple as choosing fewer reps (5 sets of 5 reps) or using fewer sets (3 sets of 10 reps). I wouldn’t change the weight on the barbell. If your body is beat to hell and you have bad knees, here are some changes that can and should be made to this part of training. All squats should be done to a box. This is essential to keep the knees from getting too sore. I cut out all of the squat assistance and use Prowler Walks and Sled Drags (forward and backward) to increase the leg volume. Prowler Walks are done for 6-8 40-yard walks with increasing weight on the Prowler. This is not done with any conditioning emphasis (although you will be out of breath). You are doing this to strengthen the legs, so push accordingly. This means walking with big steps, not sprinting. Sprinting will only serve to put more stress on your knees. Each set of Prowler walks are done with increased weight. This means you do 1-2 walks with 90 pounds and increase the weight every 1-2 40-yard walks. How heavy you go is up to you, your strength level and the surface on which you push. Remember that the point of using the Prowler at this time is to strengthen your legs and hips without stressing your knees or hips too much. So load it up and WALK! If you don’t know how much weight to do or how many trips to do – follow this mantra: DO MORE. The sled drags are done in a similar style – walk forward with the sled, and walk backward dragging the sled. This can be done while wearing a belt (attach the sled strap to the belt), using a sled harness (similar to what the Strongman competitors use) or simply holding on to the sled strap with your hands and walking forward and backward. Start with a light weight and keep
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  • Fall '19
  • Weight training, Bench press

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