Disparity is the basis for stereopsis a vivid

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Disparity is the basis for stereopsis, a vivid perception of the three- dimensionality of the world that is not available with monocular vision Demo: line up your finger with this dot using one eye. Switch eyes. Binocular disparity The two retinal images of a three-dimensional world are not the same Binocular disparity The two retinal images of a three-dimensional world are not the same! Stereopsis from binocular disparity
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12 Blue crayon falls on corresponding retinal points (so does red crayon at the fovea) Bob is still gazing at the red crayon Horopter: The location of objects whose images lie on the corresponding points. The surface of zero disparity Objects on the horopter are seen as single images when viewed with both eyes. Objects closer or farther away from the horopter fall on noncorresponding points in the two eyes and are seen as two images. The disparity between the image on the two eyes, the greater the distance in depth of the object from the horopter. Disparity in two eyes The larger the disparity, the greater the distance in depth of the object from the horopter. The sign of the disparity tells you if it is closer or farther. Crossed and uncrossed disparity
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13 The horoptor The horopter - imaginary sphere that passes through the point of focus Stereopsis (depth information provided by binocular disparity) for fun Red green anaglyph images
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14 Binocular Vision and Stereopsis Free fusion: The technique of converging (crossing) or diverging (uncrossing) the eyes in order to view a stereogram without a stereoscope “Magic Eye” pictures rely on free fusion Random dot stereogram (RDS): A stereogram made of a large number of randomly placed dots contain no monocular cues to depth Stereoblindness: An inability to make use of binocular disparity as a depth cue Can result from a childhood visual disorder, such as strabismus, in which the two eyes are misaligned Most people who are stereoblind do not realize it Binocular Vision and Stereopsis . Bela Julesz in 1959 Random dot stereogram Christopher Tyler
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