AbPsych - Research paper draft

Comer 2011 treatment for generalized anxiety disorder

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muscle tension, and/or sleep disturbance. (Comer, 2011) Treatment for generalized anxiety disorder focuses on three different styles; psychodynamic, cognitive, and biological. Psychodynamic therapy consists of therapies such as free association, resistance, and dreams where as cognitive therapy focuses on changing maladaptive assumptions, and breaking down worrying. Finally biological treatment relates more to medication and relaxation training. These are three forms of treatment that are utilized conditionally towards the overall improvement of a generalized anxiety disorder. Short-Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in Generalized Anxiety Disorder , by Falk Leichsenring et al. (2009)
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4 This article examines and compares the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy and psychodynamic psychotherapy. In this study it is recognized that cognitive- behavioral therapy has been established as an effective treatment for generalized anxiety disorder. Due to the lack of existing studies, these researchers wished to assess the outcomes of short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy treatment of generalized anxiety disorder patients. Cognitive-behavioral therapies has much support from research previously conducted therefore the therapists were more trained and prepared for a structured interaction with clients as opposed to the therapists applying psychodynamic psychotherapy who were not specifically trained in their treatment model. Throughout the study both treatments were not evenly implemented and a treatment manual was only utilized with the cognitive behavioral therapy. Sample characteristics. The study initially resulted the screening of 231 potential subjects, however 174 subjects did not meet the inclusion and/or exclusion criteria, which resulted in a final subject pool of 57, all of which were recruited through psychotherapist and physician referrals. “The mean number of completed sessions for cognitive-behavioral therapy was 28.8 (SD=3.4) and for short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy was 29.1 (SD=3.1)” (Falk Leichsenring et al., 2009). Within this study all sessions were audio taped and tested for validity of treatment sessions. The validity testing consisted of a randomized selection of the audiotapes and rating by nine independent raters who received adequate information on both treatment manuals. The results concluded that 26 (89.7%) of 29 cognitive-behavioral therapy sessions were conducted correctly in accordance to the treatment manual and for short-term
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5 Generalized Anxiety Disorder psychodynamic psychosocial therapy 24 (85.7%) of 28 were properly conducted. (Falk Leichsenring et al., 2009) This study took place from May 2001 – June 2007 at the Georg-August- University Goettingen. Researchers conducting the study set an inclusion criterion as well as an exclusion criterion. The inclusive criteria had two requirements that needed to be met in order to be considered for the subject pool. The first required subjects to be between eighteen and sixty-five years of age and they were required to have a primary diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder. In addition to the inclusion criteria there was
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