o When he was stationed in the provinces as an upcoming official thats when

O when he was stationed in the provinces as an

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o When he was stationed in the provinces as an upcoming official, that’s when Anna’s aunt (who Anna was living with) started inviting this prominent, eligible man to their house, and then after he’d been coming for a while, she tells him that he has to marry her because he’s been visiting her so much. And Karenin, unlike Vronsky, does the honourable thing. Having wound up being married, he concentrates on her all the love he has. Now that she’s gone and everyone he meets has mirth towards him, there’s one particularly amazing moment with the secretary. o The only thing he can say to his secretary is “so you’ll get that ready for me tomorrow?” when he really wants to say “so you’ve heard about my troubles?” He can’t speak, cosmic loneliness. Nobody has any need for his Christian love. Seryozha, Karenin’s son, has a sad fate, not just because his mother has left him and he winds up in the hands of mainly of Countess Lydia (cruel, sadistic, hypocritical). o When Anna comes to visit, she gets him all excited (“I knew you were alive! I knew you would come, I knew it, I knew it!”) and then she leaves and he has nothing to do with this feeling ever after. Later on, when Stiva comes to talk to Karenin, ostensibly he now wants to talk about this divorce… and they tell him, when you see Seryozha,
don’t mention his mother, he’s in hysterics, it’s incredibly painful to him (you can’t just mention him and then go away). But Stiva can’t resist mentioning it. And he is afraid of feeling, it hurts too much – you’re left there all by yourself with no one who will attend to them. These moments define scenes that point towards the making of a Karenin. Moments like these make someone a Karenin – he is going to resemble his father and be unable to express his feelings. It’s because of the abandonment, raising of feelings and then abandonment again. Part 6: development of many events, not necessarily the occurrence of these events. o At the beginning, Varenka has come to visit, and there’s the possibility that she will marry Levin’s half-brother, Sergey Ivanovich. He’s never married before because of some silly romantic notion of his lost love, Marie. But he believes it. And now he thinks, ‘well, maybe, I’ll get married’. Both of them are out in the countryside and they decide, ‘this is the time – now or never’. The chapter begins with him about to say to her this speech he’s prepared. Instead, he says, “are there mushrooms around here?” Just as he’s about to say it, something interrupts; it’s not quite said, he doesn’t bring it out, one of the children runs by, and they both decide that it wasn’t meant to be. This is a non-proposal scene (when you’re expecting a proposal and it doesn’t happen) . Sometimes the most event in the world are the ones that don’t happen and they could; in this case, they don’t happen for a particular reason – not because they are not suited to each other (they are), not because he can’t be false to Marie (this is simply a rationalization) – it doesn’t happen because they decide, now or never. This

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