Subscriber McGill University date 26 July 2020 the musics being recorded

Subscriber mcgill university date 26 july 2020 the

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Subscriber: McGill University; date: 26 July 2020 the music's being recorded separately in Abbey Road Studios, under the supervision of the veteran producer Fred Gaisberg. 4 Gaisberg was particularly pleased with the resultant “exceptionally fine” discs, which were also issued as stand‐alone recordings by HMV, although he was convinced that nothing could equal the live impact of the master: “Of the greatness of Paderewski or Chaliapin neither gramophone or film can give anything but a faint suggestion. It is only when I hear a record of either that I realise the futility of trying to reflect their greatness by mechanical means.” 5 The recordings included not just the Chopin and Liszt pieces already mentioned, but also the first movement of Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata (partially heard as an encore in the “recital” and then played complete at the close of the film) and Paderewski's own inevitable Minuet in G (performed by the maestro in a later scene as the accompaniment to a children's dance). The pieces Paderewski played for the film were understandably biased toward the crowd pleasers at the end of his usual recitals (it is notable that we catch a glimpse in the movie of a printed program that includes such pieces as Bach's Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue but hear not a note of these rather more recondite works), which in turn had their popularity reinforced by their appearance in the movie. The Moonlight Sonata itself had been a favorite since Beethoven's day— the composer himself exclaimed to Czerny, “Everyone's constantly talking about this sonata!” 6 —and Mark Hambourg's 1909 disk of the opening movement had been one of the first piano best sellers of the recording era for HMV. Chopin's A♭ Polonaise, in the repertoire of many a virtuoso, got yet more celluloid exposure (this time performed woodenly on the soundtrack by José Iturbi, but, bizarrely, with the filmed hands of Ervin Nyíregyházi) in the beloved if ridiculously romanticized Chopin biopic A Song to Remember (1945). Artur Rubinstein just happened to choose to play the same piece for his cameo role in Carnegie Hall (1947), and it frequently ended Horowitz's recitals from the 1930s to the 1980s. It was, in fact, the closing item on the program of Horowitz's last‐ever public performance, in the Hamburg Musikhalle on 21 June 1987 (followed by two encores—the Schubert Moment musical op. 94 no. 3, and Moritz Moszkowski's Etincelles ). The trusty Polonaise even featured in the episode “Samantha on the Keyboard” of the television comedy series Bewitched in 1968, where the (p.36) ability to perform it was treated as an instantly recognizable sign of a (magically enhanced) child prodigy—as indeed it probably would be. Specially concocted piano and orchestra versions of the Liszt Second Rhapsody even more memorably turned up as fodder for Tom and Jerry and Bugs Bunny in the award‐winning and hilarious cartoons “Cat Concerto” (1945) and “Rhapsody Rabbit” (1945). 7 For the former, the hand movements of Pachmann were apparently used as a general basis for the animation (although the piece in question was never in Pachmann's repertoire). It would be a mistake to
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