A house thats painted white ˈ hot ˈ dog a dog that

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(a house that’s painted white) ˈ hot ˈ dog (a dog that feels hot) If you don’t already know, how can you tell if a combination of words is a compound noun or an adjective plus a noun? Here are some guidelines, although they don’t always work: If it’s written as one word or as two words with a hyphen, it’s a compound noun. If it’s written as two words, the more common, well- established phrases are more likely to be compounds. More unusual or unpredictable phrases are probably not, but sometimes it’s hard to tell. For example, the following box lists some compound nouns beginning with the word school and some phrases that use school to modify a noun . Compound nouns (Stress on first part) Not compound nouns (Stress on both parts) School age School board School book School boy School bus School child School day School district School girl School hours Schoolhouse Schoolroom School teacher School work School year School administrator School classroom School colors School counselor School diploma School festival School library School lunch School nurse School principal School project School psychologist School transportation School trip School violence Overall, the ! rst group has more common combinations that have been in use for a long time, like schoolhouse and schoolteacher , and the second group has less common or more recent phrases, like school psychologist or school trip. Still, it’s often hard to predict whether a particular phrase is a compound noun or an adjective plus noun. So what can students do? When they learn a new compound word, they should learn its stress pattern along with its pronunciation. Listen to it when it’s modeled, practice saying 108
it correctly, and get used to the whole sound of it. They should also pay attention to the stress patterns of commonly used adjective-noun combinations when they hear them, just as they do when they learn new vocabulary words. Still, learners will probably use incorrect stress from time to time, just as they probably make mistakes in pronouncing sounds. This is an inevitable part of learning. Stress in phrasal verbs English also has many phrasal verbs, or two-word verbs, such as put on, get up, turn off, and take over. Phrasal verbs are usually written as two separate words, and in sentences, their two parts are sometimes separated by other words. Unlike compound nouns, phrasal verbs are usually stressed on the second part, especially when it comes at the end of a sentence or thought group. Please come ˈ in . Pick it ˈ up . I turned it ˈ on . However, when a phrasal verb is followed by a noun that is its object, the stress is di " erent. The ! rst part of the verb receives a little stress, and the primary stress moves to the object of the phrasal verb: Pick up the ˈ pa per. I turned on the ˈ light .

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