Was he a left or right wing demagogue you should be

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reflected on the “ideological ambiguity” of Long. Was he a “left” or “right-wing” demagogue? You should be able to answer all of these questions and more—explain the reasons for Long’s appeal in the context of the Depression—after reading the essay by Hogan and Williams. From that essay, you should be able to answer not only “factual” questions about Long–i.e. who was Long, what was his popular nickname (The Kingfish), etc., but also have some sense of whyhe seemed to attract so much support, not only in Louisiana, but across the country. Sept. 25: Father Coughlin and Pseudo-Religious DemagogueryFather Coughlin, the Radio Priest, built a huge national following with a style of speech 7
rooted clearly in the populist tradition. Beginning with sermons in 1926, he became increasingly political in his speeches, ultimately posing a serious challenge to president Franklin Roosevelt in 1936. Lashing out against the New Deal, he declared that both democracy and capitalism were under attack and that a conspiracy of international bankers (i.e. Jewish bankers!) were really calling the shots. Increasingly anti-semitic, Coughlin eventually alienated many of his own followers with his wild conspiracy theories and doomsday scenarios.In addition to one of Coughlin’s speeches, we read an article by Douglas McCollam that compared Coughlin to Glen Beck, a hero of today’s Tea Party movement. He argued that, like Coughlin, Beck has attracted a large and loyal following, gets high ratings for his radio show, and can mobilize thousands of people for public demonstrations and letter-writing campaigns. Yet as with Coughlin, McCollam argues, Beck does not really appear to have much influence over elections. His populist style stirs up people, gets them emotionally involved, even angry. But according to McCollam, that passion does not seem to translate into lots of votes. Put another way, the political significance of both Coughlin and Beck may be exaggerated because their followers are so vocal and passionate.Sept. 30: Good” Propaganda: Public Relations and the “Social Hygiene”Movement. As we noted, many of “progressives” who worked for the CPI in World War I helped found the modern public relations industry. Edward Bernays, the father of modern public relations, is one of them, and the document we read from Bernays shows how the propagandists of the time imagined the possibility of “good” propaganda, if only public relations practitioners turned their talents to promoting peaceful goals rather than war and subscribed to a code of ethicslike other “professionals,” such as doctors or lawyers. Note how Bernay’s essay reflects the “magic bullet” view of propaganda’s power and argues that this power can be used for either good or evil. So he proposes a “code of ethics” for PR “counsels” (also note how the term “counsels” compares PR practitioners to lawyers and other “professionals”): they must not plead cases that are “socially unsound,” they must not take on clients with conflicting interests, they

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