Can be as simple as the introduction of a colour

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can be as simple as the introduction of a colour break (see 3.2.1), or as complex as creating surface pattern or even optical illusion. These patterns can be created in many ways (with material breaks, paint, decals etc.) and for many different reasons. As superyachts are leisure craft, we might lean towards the decorative but if our motive is surface disruption, we might also look at military craft and DPM (Disruptive Patterned Material) for inspiration. An example of DPM is the dazzle camouflage (Figure 12) used in World War I to optically distort ships so as to confuse the enemy. Figure 12: Dazzle Camouflage [18] There are similar experiments with architecture. Felice Varini is a Swiss artist who works with projector stencil techniques, creating pattern and illusion. His work can only be viewed cohesively from a certain angle (see Figures 13-14). Figures 13-14: Huit Rectangles (2007) by Felice Varini [19] Of course decorative surface patterns abound in architecture, but there are clearly opportunities to pursue more interesting and illusionary applications. 3.2.3 HAPTICS (3D) ‘There have been recent signs of an increased demand for surfaces that can be experienced sensually’ Christiane Sauer [20] The majority of buildings consist of a palette of materials with highly varied textures, from smooth glass, to rough concrete, to much larger deviations of the surface from the plane. Before we enter inside the superyacht, we encounter an object that might be described as ‘monohaptic’. Though sensations in thermal conductivity may change (where materials feel warm or cool), there is very little textural difference between stainless steel, painted steel, fibreglass and highly lacquered timber. So we find more opportunities for disruption. These haptic changes could be micro (the introduction of matt or soft-touch surfaces) or macro (the introduction of deep textural surfaces). Texture may be created by the
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material itself, the form the material is given (pattern), or by joints (such as mortar in brickwork) creating a textural array. Haptic surfaces may be patterned or random. Of course, textural elements can cause difficulties – they can (if allowed) become havens for dirt and microorganisms and so must be used appropriately. ‘The current revival of ornamental forms and patterned surfaces can be justified in view of the new technological opportunities.’ Christiane Sauer [20] Continued advances in CNC (Computer Numerical Controlled) technologies are allowing us to mill, cut and etch materials in low volumes, affordably and at speed. This allows architects to create bespoke textural elements. The two examples that follow show two three- dimensional surfaces designed at different scales, with different sensibilities: Herzog and de Meuron’s Forum in Barcelona (Figure 15) is rendered in a rich pigmented shotcrete giving the angular building a soft organic surface, whereas the façade of Paul Smith’s boutique at 11 Albemarle street (Figure 16) is altogether more industrial; comprising of patterned cast
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