Explain how to perform and interpret the results of an antigen detection ELISA

Explain how to perform and interpret the results of

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Explain how to perform and interpret the results of an antigen detection ELISA test They will need to draw out blood and False positives and false negatives can occur. A false-positive result indicates you have a condition when you actually don’t. A false-negative result indicates you don’t have a
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condition when you actually do. Because of this, you may be asked to repeat the ELISA again in a few weeks, or your doctor may order more sensitive tests to confirm or refute the results. Define and explain how to create a serial dilution A serial dilution is the stepwise dilution of a substance in solution. Usually the dilution factor at each step is constant, resulting in a geometric progression of the concentration in a logarithmic fashion. Calculate tube dilutions, final dilutions, and concentrations You multiply the original concentration by the dilution factors for each dilution. Identify evidence used to determine patient zero in a disease outbreak By comparing a snapshot of the infected population with computations of the spreading dynamics, the model calculates the probability that a given person may be the origin of the disease. While the method cannot unequivocally find patient zero, it could prove useful in narrowing down the origin of an epidemic. Key Terms: - Medical Intervention (1.1.1) - Diagnostic test (1.1.2) - Outbreak (1.1.2) - Pathogen (1.1.2) - Bioinformatics (1.1.3) - BLAST (1.1.3) - Deoxynucleotides (dNTs) (1.1.3) - Dideoxynucleotides (ddNTs) (1.1.3) - DNA polymerase (1.1.3) - DNA sequencing (1.1.3) - DNA sequence electropherogram (1.1.3) - Gel electrophoresis (1.1.3) - Neisseria meningitidis (1.1.3) - PCR (Polymerase chain reaction)(1.1.3) - Phosphodiester bond (1.1.3) - Primer (1.1.3) - Template DNA (1.1.3) - Antibody (1.1.5) - Antigen (1.1.5) - Antigen detection ELISA (1.1.5) - Bacterial meningitis (1.1.5) - B lymphocytes (1.1.5) - Concentration (1.1.5) - Diluent (1.1.5) - ELISA (Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay) (1.1.5) - ELISA antibody test (1.1.5) - Enzyme (1.1.5) - Final tube dilution (1.1.5) - Indirect ELISA (1.1.5) - Negative control group (1.1.5) - Positive control group (1.1.5) - Primary antibody (1.1.5) - Qualitative data (1.1.5) - Quantitative data (1.1.5) - Secondary antibody (1.1.5 - Serial dilution (1.1.5) - Substrate (1.1.5) - Tube dilution (1.1.5) - Epstein Barr virus (EBV) (1.1.6) - Human herpes virus 4 (1.1.6) - Influenza B (1.1.6) - Strep throat (1.1.6) - Streptococcus pyrogens (1.1.6) MI 1.2 Review Essential Questions: 1. Why are certain classes of antibiotics prescribed to treat specific bacterial infections? Aminoglycosides, Penicillins, Fluoroquinolones, Cephalosporins, Macrolides, and Tetracyclines 2. Why can bacterial cells transfer genes from one bacterial cell to another and why is this important? They can move bacterial genes that give bacteria antibiotic resistance or make them disease-causing. 3. How has the development of antibiotics impacted human health?
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Antibiotics have revolutionised modern medicine by making previously incurable illnesses like pneumonia, scarlet fever and tuberculosis and life-threatening infections treatable.
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