Quote 7 but o the noble combat that twixt joy and

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Quote #7 But O, the noble combat that 'twixt joy and sorrow was fought in Paulina! She had one eye declined for the loss of her husband, another elevated that the oracle was fulfilled: she lifted the princess from the earth, and so locks her in embracing, as if she would pin her to her heart that she might no more be in danger of losing. (5.2.4) Perdita’s arrival in Sicily is a bitter sweet moment for Paulina. On the one hand, she’s elated to see her friend Hermione’s long lost daughter. On the other hand, Perdita’s recovery reminds her that her own husband, Antigonus, remains lost. Compassion and Forgiveness
Quote #8 LEONTES O, she's warm! If this be magic, let it be an art Lawful as eating. POLIXENES She embraces him. CAMILLO She hangs about his neck: If she pertain to life let her speak too. (5.3.13) When Hermione is reunited with Leontes, it seems that she has already forgiven him for his sins against her. She “embraces him” and “hangs about his neck” as though he’s not the man responsible for sixteen years of suffering. What’s up with that? Compassion and Forgiveness
Quote #9 You gods look down And from your sacred vials pour your graces Upon my daughter's head! Tell me, mine own. Where hast thou been preserved? where lived? how found Thy father's court? for thou shalt hear that I, Knowing by Paulina that the oracle Gave hope thou wast in being, have preserved Myself to see the issue. (5.3.1) Is Hermione’s “resurrection” the result of Perdita’s arrival in Sicily?
Quote #10 O, peace, Paulina! Thou shouldst a husband take by my consent, As I by thine a wife: this is a match, And made between's by vows. (5.3.14) In the play’s final scene, sixteen long years of suffering at the Sicilian court give way to the joyous and miraculous reunion of Leontes's family, the seeming resurrection of Hermione, the renewal of Leontes's friendship with Polixenes, and the union of Florizel and Perdita, which takes care of the whole Sicily-is-without- an-heir problem. Here, even Paulina gets engaged to Camillo in a moment that renews domestic and social order.
THEMES SUMMARY THE WINTER’S TALE THEME OF JEALOUSY The first three acts of The Winter’s Tale are a study of jealousy and its destructive effects. In the play, Leontes’s sudden and unfounded fear that his pregnant wife is sleeping with his best friend eats away at him like a disease. Leontes’s wild jealousy is often compared to that of Othello . Both men unfairly suspect their wives of infidelity and their violent responses destroy their families and upset the political balance. The differences, however, are significant. Unlike Othello, Leontes convinces
himself of his wife’s “affair” all by himself – there’s no Iago figure whispering in his ear and goading him along. (If anything, Leontes is his own Iago.) More importantly, Leontes’s abuse of his family is not entirely permanent, unlike Othello’s. After repenting and suffering for sixteen long years, Leontes is reunited with his wife and long-lost daughter, which puts a redemptive spin on The Winter’s Tale , whereas Othello is just plain tragic.

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