Death forms undermine promises NIT 157 10 July 2008 In 1973 in some regions the

Death forms undermine promises nit 157 10 july 2008

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estimates of Indigenous life expectancy in 2008 differed by as much as five years.” (Death forms undermine promises', NIT 157, 10 July 2008) In 1973, in some regions the median age at death was identified to be as low as 47 years and the life expectancy gap between Aboriginal people and non-indigenous people to be 25 years. “From 1996 to 2001, the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) used indirect methods for its calculations. And figures published in 2005 (59.4 years for males and 64.8 years for females) indicated a gap of 17 years between indigenous and non- indigenous life expectancy, although the ABS does not consider the 2005 figures to be reliable anymore. Using a new method based on tracing the deaths of people identified as Indigenous at the 2006 census, in 2009 the ABS estimated life expectancy at 67.2 years for Indigenous men (11.5 years less than for non-Indigenous) and 72.9 years for
Indigenous women (9.7 years less than for non-Indigenous). Estimated life expectancy of Indigenous men ranges from 61.5 years for those living in the Northern Territory to a high of 69.9 years for those living in New South Wales, and for Indigenous women, 69.2 years for those living in the Northern Territory to a high of 75.0 years for those living in New South Wales.” ( Australian Bureau of Statistics. 25 May 2009.) Expectations of life at birth for Indigenous and non-Indigenous males and females (ABS 2013) Cardiovascular disease (CVD) englobes diseases that affect the heart and blood vessels. Common CVD types are: heart failure heart attacks high blood pressure coronary heart disease People that smoke, drink alcohol, don’t exercise or don’t eat well (which creates a correlation between CVD and obesity, diabetes and kidney diseases) affect their cardiovascular health. CVD type diseases affect numerous Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders. “Around one-in-eight (13%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people reported in the 2012- 2013 Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health survey (AATSIHS) that they had some form of CVD. One-in-twenty-five (4%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people reported having some form of heart, stroke and/or vascular disease. Around one-in-twenty (6%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people reported having high blood pressure.” (ABS, 2015)
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women (14%) reported more CVD than Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men (11%) in 2012-2013. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people that live in remote areas had more chance to report having heart disease than those living in non-remote areas. Heart diseases are more frequent among women rather than men and among people living in remote areas rather than urbanized areas. “CVD was 1.2 times more common for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people than for non-Indigenous people.” (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015) CVD caused 6% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s hospitalization in 2014-15. Aboriginal people have twice higher chance to be hospitalized for a heart disease than non-aboriginal people. “Coronary heart disease caused the most CVD hospitalizations (40%) for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in 2013-14,

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