The plan takes a whole of island approach to

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The Plan takes a whole-of-island approach to biodiversity management, addressing management of priority species regardless of land tenure. There are a range of government and non-government organisations involved in the management of the Island’s natural resources including, but not restricted to, private landowners, King Island Council (KIC), King Island Natural Resource Management Group Inc (KINRMG), Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) and the Resource Management & Conservation Division (RMCD) — both part of the Tasmanian Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment (DPIPWE), Birds Tasmania, Tasmanian Land Conservancy (TLC), the Tasmanian Farmers and Grazers Association, Forestry Tasmania and Tasmanian Fire Service. On the Island several properties have been covenanted for conservation through government programs such as DPIPWE’s Private Land Conservation Program, and by non-government conservation organisations such as the TLC. In 2003, utilising funding from the Australian Government through the KINRMG, the TLC established a program to purchase land, covenant key vegetation communities on the property and then sell the properties on to private purchasers. Approximately 14% of the Island is Crown Land, including several different reserve types (Figure 2). The Island has four State Reserves: Lavinia State Reserve and Disappointment Bay State Reserve in the northeast, Seal Rocks State Reserve in the southwest and Cape Wickham State Reserve in the far north. State Reserves, along with Nature Reserves, Conservation Areas, Game Reserves and Crown land, are administered by PWS. These reserves are variously managed for recreation and conservation, although some are used by adjacent landowners under licence for grazing, particularly where reserves adjoin waterways. Forestry Tasmania administers the State Forest at Pegarah. PWS administer the three off-shore islands: New Year Island Game Reserve (130 ha), Christmas Island Nature Reserve (95 ha), and Councillor Island Nature Reserve (11 ha). Unallocated Crown land is also administered by PWS and has recently been assessed as part of the Crown Land Assessment and Classification Project (CLAC Project Team 2005a & 2005b). Crown reserves also border some parts of the river systems, around some wetlands and lagoons and around much of coastline of the Island. Further details regarding the classes of reserves can be found at: . King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 4
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Figure 2. Reserves on King Island King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 5
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1.2 Interaction with other documents There are nine existing national or Tasmanian recovery plans and draft recovery plans that discuss threatened species present on King Island. For more background information refer to separate Recovery Plans for the scrambling groundfern ( Hypolepis distans ) (Threatened Species Section 2011a), leafy greenhood ( Pterostylis cucullata subsp. cucullata ) (Threatened Species Section 2006a; Duncan 2009), coast dandelion ( Taraxacum cygnorum ) (Carter 2004),
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  • Fall '14
  • The Hours, ........., Threatened species, Bass Strait, Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, King Island

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