Glencoe Health 2005.pdf

Identify the functions of the skin examine the

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Identify the functions of the skin. Examine the effects of health behaviors on skin, hair, and nails. Relate the importance of recognizing warning signs that lead to the early detection of skin diseases and prompt individuals of all ages to seek health care. eads of perspiration form on your forehead while you are B exercising or when you are outside on a hot day. Your skin, the largest organ of your body, produces perspiration in order to help keep your body cool. Skin is the main organ of the integumentary system, which also includes hair, nails, and glands found in your skin. Your skin serves as a physical barrier between the outside world and your internal organs. It shields them from injury, and it is the first line of defense against pathogens entering your body. Structure and Function of the Skin he skin consists of two main layers, as shown in Figure 14.1. T The is the outer, thinner layer of the skin that is composed of living and dead cells. The is the thicker layer of the skin beneath the epidermis that is made up of connective tissue and con- tains blood vessels and nerves. The epidermis is composed of several layers. The top layer consists of dead cells that are constantly being shed and replaced. In the deeper layers of the epidermis, living cells continually divide and replace dying cells, which are pushed toward the surface layer. dermis epidermis Divide a sheet of paper into three columns labeled “Skin,” “Hair,” and “Nails.” Record how much time you spend over the course of one day on personal grooming in these areas. How do these personal grooming habits affect your health? 360 Chapter 14 Personal Care and Healthy Behaviors Washing your face regularly keeps skin free of dirt, bacteria, and perspiration. How does keeping your face and hands clean affect your overall health?
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361 Lesson 1 Healthy Skin, Hair, and Nails hair dead epidermis living epidermis sweat pore sebaceous gland hair follicle muscle duct of sweat gland sweat gland artery vein nerve fat tissue Epidermis Subcutaneous Layer Dermis S TRUCTURE OF THE S KIN The two main layers of skin, the epidermis and the dermis, are attached to bones and muscles by the subcutaneous layer, a layer of fat and connective tissue located beneath the dermis. Certain cells in the epidermis make a substance called keratin , a protein that toughens nails. These same cells also pro- duce substances called lipids, which make your skin waterproof. This waterproofing helps the body maintain a proper balance of water and electrolytes. Other cells produce a pigment that gives the skin, hair, and iris of the eyes their color —the more melanin, the darker the skin. People with fair skin have less melanin and are at risk of damage from harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation.
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