asbestos-related_disease_indicators.doc

Figure 3 shows the combined number of claims for

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Figure 3 shows the combined number of claims for mesothelioma compensated by the NSW Dust Diseases Board and state, territory and Commonwealth workers’ compensation schemes from 2002 to 2008. The number of accepted claims for both men and women increased between 2002 and 2003 but have been declining since 2003. In 2008, there were 206 claims for men and 14 for women. Figure 3 Compensated mesothelioma claims: number by sex, 2002 to 2008p 300
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Number of claims 250 Males 200 150 100 50 Females 0 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008p Year of claim Note: Data for workers compensation for 2008 are preliminary data only. Sources: NSW Dust Diseases Board and NDS. Asbestos-related Disease Indicators, August 2010 ... 4
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Deaths Figure 4 shows that the overall number of deaths resulting from mesothelioma increased over the period between 1997 and 2008. The number of deaths reached a maximum of 628 registered deaths in 2008; this followed a brief decline after an earlier peak of 545 in 2004. Most of these decedents were male, with an average of 81% of total deaths over the eleven-year period. Care should be taken interpreting the data for the last two years as they are based on year of registration rather than year of death. The increase may be due to an accumulation of deaths being held over from one calendar year to the next; however, this usually only affects around 5% of deaths. It is possible the decline and subsequent increase may smooth out when the data are updated.
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Number of deaths Figure 4 Deaths due to mesothelioma: number by sex, 1997 to 2008 (a) 700 600 Total 500 400 Males 300 200 100 Females 0 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Year of death (a) Dotted line indicates data for 2007 and 20 08 which are based on year of registration, not year of death. Note: Data on the number of mesothelioma deaths are only available from 1997 when the WHO International Coding of Diseases allocated mesothelioma a unique code (it had previously been grouped with other cancers of the pleura). In contrast, the number of new cases of mesothelioma diagnosed each year is available from 1982 because it is disease notifiable by legislation to state and territory cancer registries who release this data to AIHW. Sources: AIHW Australian Cancer Incidence and Mortality Book s (compiled by AIHW from data supplied by state and territory cancer registries) and ABS Cau se of Death data . Figure 5 shows that the overall age-standardised rate of death due to mesothelioma has remained relatively stable over the 11 years for which data are available. Over the period the standardised rate has ranged between a minimum of 2.1 deaths per 100 000 in 1999 and a maximum of 2.7 in 2001. The standardised rate in 2007 was 2.4 deaths per 100 000 population. 5 ... Safe Work Australia
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Figure 5 Deaths due to mesothelioma: age-standardised mortality rate by sex, 1997 to 2007 (a) (a) Dotted line indicates data for 2007 based on year of registration, not year of death. Note: Age-standardisation is a method used to improve comparability of data over time.
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