EBSCOhost printed on 1122020 608 PM via COLUMBIA SOUTHERN EDUCATION GROUP All

Ebscohost printed on 1122020 608 pm via columbia

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EBSCOhost - printed on 11/2/2020 6:08 PM via COLUMBIA SOUTHERN EDUCATION GROUP. All use subject to
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Case Studies and Lessons Learned 271 For example, in the mid-1990s, a group with ties to the Armed Islamic Group (GIA), dubbed the Rou- baix Gang, targeted supermarkets, banks, and ar- mored cars. In March 1996, members of the gang attempted to bomb the G-7 meeting in Lille, France; fortuitously, the car bomb was defused before it could detonate. Further, in March 2004, Moroccan Islamic Combatant Group (GICM) operatives in Paris worked with Hassan Baouchi to steal more than $1.2 million. Baouchi, who restocked ATMs for a security company, claimed that masked rob- bers had forced him to open six different ATMs and then vanished. French authorities eventually saw through Baouchi’s deception and arrested him for theft. A terrorist arrested in Algeria possessed $40,000 of the money Baouchi stole. According to press reports, terrorist involvement in criminal activity has been greatly facilitated by increased cooperation with organized criminal net- works. As Robert Charles, formerly the State De- partment’s Assistant Secretary of State for Interna - tional Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) under Secretaries Colin Powell and Condoleezza Rice, assessed, “transnational crime is converging with the terrorist world.” The head of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, Antonio Maria Costa, has echoed Charles’ analysis, noting, “The world is seeing the birth of a new hybrid of orga- nized-crime-terrorist organizations.” In the years to come, the crime-terror nexus will likely be further strengthened due to the spread of radical Islam in prison. Although criminality is outlawed under Islamic law, the al Qaeda manual advises that “necessity permits the forbidden.” Reflecting this theory, when Jemaah Islamiyah (JI) operatives questioned whe- ther hacking into foreigners’ bank accounts was acceptable in Islam, JI leader Abu Bakr Bashir re - portedly responded, “[if] you can take their blood; then why not take their property?” Other Plots Targeting Military Facilities in the United States . Since 9/11, other indicted ter- rorists have considered launching attacks against military facilities in the United States. Most notably, in May 2007, authorities indicted six men who were allegedly plotting to attack the Fort Dix Army base in New Jersey. A court filing states that one of the suspects “explained that they could utilize six or seven jihadists to attack and kill at least one hun- dred soldiers by using rocket-propelled grenades (‘RPGs’) or other weapons.” In a separate conver- sation, the same suspect declared, “My intent is to hit a heavy concentration of soldiers.” The men considered Fort Dix an appealing target because one of the suspects, Serdar Tatar, had delivered piz- zas there and thus knew “it like the palm of his hand.” Court filings allege that the group also conduct- ed surveillance of Fort Monmouth (NJ), Lakehurst Naval Station (NJ), Dover Air Force Base (DE), and the U.S. Coast Guard Building in Philadelphia. The
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