Stuck pixels can be fixed by playing special videos

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Stuck pixels can be fixed by playing special videos that display a series of colors. Sometimes the video needs to be played for several hours. Most of the time, dead pixels are caused by a malfunctioning pixel and cannot be fixed. If playing the video does not fix stuck or dead pixels, the only way to fix the problem is by replacing the monitor. Image retention, screen burn-in Image retention (IR) is caused by a static image being displayed for too long on a screen, creating a shadow of the image that is visible even when the display is off. This is typically a problem for plasma displays only. Most of the time, IR can be fixed by displaying bright white on the screen for an extended period of time. When the image cannot be fixed and is permanent on the screen, it is known as burn-in. Video files do not play, audio plays but no video Digital video can be saved in one of several file formats (called codecs ). Before you can play a video file, your computer must have the corresponding codecs installed. Many video files actually use two codecs: one for video and one for audio. If the audio plays but the video does not, you know you have the correct audio codec but need the video codec installed. Device Installation 0:00-0:19 Most devices that you install on a system require little to no configuration. They simply work after you plug them in. This is because devices are automatically assigned the necessary system resources and communication channels, and the appropriate device drivers are automatically installed. Assigned System Resources 0:20-1:06 There are three types of system resources assigned to the computer. The first is an IO address. Every device connected to your computer must have a unique IO address, which is represented by a hexadecimal number. This address allows devices to communicate with each other. The second resource is called an interrupt request line, or IRQ. IRQs are used to send interrupt messages to the processor to use processing resources. Modern computers allow for sharing of IRQs. The third resource a device might assign is called a DMA channel. DMA stands for direct memory access. DMA channels bypass the CPU and create a direct communication line to a system memory.The most common device that uses a DMA channel is an I triple E 1394 interface. Plug and Play 1:07-1:20 Devices that are able to automatically have resources assigned to them are known as plug and play devices. Almost all modern devices are plug and play. This eliminates the need to manually configure things like IRQs and IO addresses. Legacy Devices 1:21-1:34 Older devices that require manual resource assignment are known as legacy devices. Legacy devices need a dedicated IRQ in order to operate. The OS reserves IRQs zero through 15 for legacy devices.
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