Be found at the end of the intervention

This preview shows page 80 - 82 out of 390 pages.

be found at the end of the intervention, psychoeducation may reduce psychological distress in the long term. Support groups may also be effective in improving carers’ experience of caring and reducing psychological distress. However, these findings should be viewed with caution because the studies included in this review are based in East Asia and the services provided there are not directly comparable with the UK. In addition, there was limited evidence that enhanced psychoeducation (providing information, as well as focusing on self-carer skills, coping skills and problem-solving) was more effective than standard psychoeducation (information only) in improving the experience of caring and self-care behaviour at the end of the intervention. However, longer-term effects are not known. Self-management was not found to be beneficial over control on any critical outcomes. However, this was based on a single high-quality study and a trend favouring self-management was observed. Problem-solving bibliotherapy was not found to be effective at improving any critical outcomes at the end of the intervention; however, it was found to improve quality of life at short-term follow-up. Finally, there was no detectable difference in effectiveness between psychoeducation delivered by post or delivered by a practitioner, or between group and individual psychoeducation. A simple cost analysis estimated that the cost of group psychoeducation aiming to improve carers’ experience of caring and of health and social c are services ranges between £190 and £1,095 (mean of £582) in 2011/12 prices, depending on the type of health professional (clinical psychologist, psychiatric nurse or consultant psychiatrist) that delivers the intervention. Table 5 contains the original recommendations from Psychosis and Schizophrenia in Adults (NICE, 2014) in the first column and the associated review question(s) and evidence base in the second column. The adapted/incorporated recommendations are shown in the third column and reasons for doing so are provided in the fourth column.
Bipolar disorder (update) 80 Table 5: Recommendations incorporated or adapted from another NICE guideline Original recommendation from Psychosis and Schizophrenia in Adults (NICE, 2014) Review question and evidence base of existing recommendation Recommendation following adaptation/incorporation for this guideline (numbering is from the NICE guideline recommendations) Reasons for adaptation/incorporation 1.1.5.1 Offer carers of people with psychosis or schizophrenia an assessment (provided by mental health services) of their own needs and discuss with them their strengths and views. Develop a care plan to address any identified needs, give a copy to the carer and their GP and ensure it is reviewed annually.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture