The authority used the power of eminent domain to

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The authority used the power of eminent domain to acquire only two holdout properties and to clear title to abandoned and tax-delinquent properties. Relocation grants ranging from $10,000 to $20,000 helped residents make downpayments on new homes. Having completed a carefully phased redevelopment program in 2006, the authority successfully returned more than one-third of the displaced households to the Freetown community, which now numbers about 200 families. Urban Land Institute GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. -7- © 2018 The College Board. Visit the College Board on the Web: .
2018 AP ® ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS Source E Marciuliano, Francesco. “Bizarro.” Cartoon. King Features Syndicate , 1 Aug. 2008, bizarro.com/comics/august-1-2008/. The following cartoon was published in a nationally syndicated comic strip. BIZARRO © 2008 DAN PIRARO DISTRIBUTED BY KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. -8- © 2018 The College Board. Visit the College Board on the Web: .
2018 AP ® ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS Source F Narciso, Dean. “1 Mile Equals $595,625, Jury Decides.” The Columbus Dispatch, 11 Oct. 2007, 309299842. The following article, about a situation in the town of Canal Winchester, Ohio, was published in a local newspaper. When Canal Winchester offered Richard “Pete” Stebelton $9,249 for a 1-mile strip of his property, Stebelton thought the payment was too low. Boy, was it ever. This month, a Franklin County Common Pleas jury decided the village should pay the farmer and used-car dealer $595,625. Canal Winchester wants the land to link a bike path between Rager Road and the village swimming pool. It used eminent domain to take a strip of Stebelton’s 80-acre property and hired an appraiser who determined that the $9,249 would be enough compensation. “It wasn’t fair at all,” Stebelton, 75, remembers thinking. Stebelton was the only one of eight property owners who didn’t agree to sell his land to the village for the path. Instead, he went to court to challenge the village’s valuation. The jury decided Sept. 20 that the land the village wants, along the northern edge of his property, is worth $37,000. But the jury also decided that by taking it, the village was closing off a back entrance to the property and damaging the value of the rest of Stebelton’s land by $558,625. “I was thrilled. I would have to be,” Stebelton said of the victory, adding that the trial “put me through one hell of a miserable week.” Stebelton lives in a home built in 1825. He grows hay and raises horses on the land he bought 21 years ago for $300,000. Canal Winchester’s former mayor, Marshal Hall, offered Stebelton $60,000 years ago. But Stebelton turned that down. Hall was replaced by Mayor Jeff Miller four years ago. Stebelton was offered the $9,249 as part of a deal in which the Ohio Department of Transportation [ODOT] agreed to finance 80 percent of construction costs for the $1.57 million bike path project.

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