2 secondly the student should voluntarily accept to

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2. Secondly, the student should voluntarily accept to take part in the survey. Instrumentation The types of instruments used in the collection of data for this data were mainly two, that is, a socio-demographic questionnaire and secondly a Death Attitude Profile Assessment Scale (EAPAM) (Dunn, 2012). These inquiries are developed by the researcher based on evidence from literature reviews and past studies on a similar topic. The socio-demographic questionnaire is composed of both closed questions and the open-ended questions. Some of the demographic variables under this instrument include age, marital status, and level of education among others. On the other hand, the second tool is mainly targeted towards gauging the nursing students’ feelings and thoughts towards the dying patients and how they deal with their families and relatives. The survey tries to find out their clinical experience after the death of a patient who was under their care (Kent, Anderson & Owens, 2012). Furthermore, it seeks to assess the adequacy of the existing palliative care on terminal patients.
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QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH STUDY 6 Secondly is the EAPAM, this is a piece of equipment that was developed to analyze people’s willingness to accept death. Individuals’ response towards death as a phenomenon is usually varied depending on their traditional beliefs, culture, and religion (Kent et al., 2012). However, this instrument has been designed in a way that it evaluates all the attitudes that are elicited by the end process of death. It measures a variety of thoughts and feelings stimulated by death such as fear, natural acceptance, avoidance of death, acceptance based on religious beliefs and escape acceptance (Jafari et al., 2015). The above dimensions for measuring attitude are then evaluated using a four-point Likert agreement scale to indicate the participants’ response towards dealing with terminal patients. The response according to the Likert scale can either be positive or negative, that is, strongly agree, agree, disagree, or strongly disagree (Kent et al., 2012). These tools are suitable for analyzing the students’ perception and thus establish the attitude the students have towards dying patients. Methods of Data Collection The day of data collection was approved by the Dean of medical students who gave the researchers the go-ahead to conduct the study. After an explaining, the intended objective of the study, the students present for the data collection were required to sign the informed consent form (Jafari et al., 2015). The researchers then issued out the questionnaires to the participants to fill out. Each participant took an average of about 25 minutes to complete the survey. Further, the participants were assured that the data collected was strict to conduct the research and hence there will be no kind of victimization. The data was then fed into the computer awaiting analysis by the use of SPSS program. Ethical Considerations
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QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH STUDY 7 Before commencing the process of data collection, the students signed the informed consent forms indicating that they are willing to participate. The researcher explained the objectives of the study to all the participants so that they don’t feel there is some hidden information the researchers want to know (Kent et al., 2012). All the students participating were
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