Works Cited 2014 February 16 The Reciprocity Principle Give Before You Take in

Works cited 2014 february 16 the reciprocity

This preview shows page 7 - 8 out of 8 pages.

Works Cited (2014, February 16). The Reciprocity Principle: Give Before You Take in Web Design. Retrieved from Cialdini, R. B. (2001). The Science of Persuasion. Scientific American, 284(2), 76–81. doi: 10.1038/scientificamerican0201-76 0 8 /27/2019 Journal #1 (Revised) Pre-Suasion Researchers have studied factors of influence for over sixty years. Persuasion is the act of influ- encing. Persuasion is a science, rather than an art form or God-given talent. Robert Cialdini con- firms that this can be a learned behavior. “Pre-suasion is the practice of gaining agreement with a message before you deliver it.” In other words, pre-suasion is the technique of arranging a sym- pathetic response prior to delivering a message. “Who we are, when it comes to making any choice, is highly determined by where our attention is, in the moment before we make a choice.” In one video, Cialdini describes a marketing survey. Researchers asked people to take part; origi- nally, only 29% obliged. After, the request was proceeded with another question, “Do you con- sider yourself a helpful person?” Participation spiked; 77% of those asked agreed to participate in the survey. Additional research indicates, that a picture depicting a runner winning a race can evoke a goal-oriented mindset. A picture of Auguste Rodin’s The Thinker can conjure intellec- tual and cerebral thoughts. In a third video, Cialdini describes a study. An online furniture store, wanting to sell more comfortable sofas, used a picture of fluffy clouds of their website. In turn, patrons considered comfort as more important feature. They prioritized comfort in the filters and, ultimately, purchased more comfortable items. Ideally, we can shift people's attention prior to de- livering persuasive (messages) requests. These “practical implications” can alter the focus of the recipient. Thus, making the message more effective. This sounds like magic! Nonetheless, this is an established science. Works Cited Forum, L. B. (2016, October 18). Retrieved from ? v=PoviPFw0VbU
Image of page 7
Inc. (2019, January 21). Retrieved from - U&t=1043s Influenceatwork. (2012, November 26). Retrieved from - CzN7RYbw Think, B. (2016, September 18). Retrieved from - HVSvU 08/25/2019 Journal #1 (Original) Six Principles of Persuasion Influence is defined by ones capacity to effect something, or more often someone. In several YouTube videos, Robert Cialdini outlines six “universal principles” of influence; observed be- haviors during his related research. The first principle is reciprocity. This is a mutual exchange of benefits. For example, if a grocery store clerk offers you a free sample, you might be obliged to listen to there product-related spiel or even purchase the item. Second, scarcity or shortage cre- ates influence. If an item is presented as rare, unavailable, or uncommon, patrons are likely to purchase quickly. Third, commitment inspires consistency. Cialdini explains, fidelity and adher- ence are pillars of influence. Registered voters who pledge via telephone to vote during an elec-
Image of page 8

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 8 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture