Therefore in order to form a hurricane the cluster of

This preview shows page 32 - 38 out of 50 pages.

hurricane cannot circulate. Therefore, in order to form a hurricane, the cluster of thunderstorms must be at least 5 °  N or S of the equator. Notes For a hurricane to form, it must be at least 5 °  N or S of the equator Without the Coriolis Force, the winds cannot circulate around the low-pressure center. In the image below, no hurricanes will form between the dotted lines. Map of the globe with a red line to indicate the position of the equator; the two dotted lines to indicate the position of 5 °  N and  5 °  S. Hurricanes cannot form between the dotted lines.
Lecture 3: Structure and Formation Part 2 1. Destructive Forces Overview: Storm Surge Destructive Forces Hurricanes are widely regarded as the most destructive storms on the planet. In the US, hurricanes  typically top the  weather-related disaster list  every year. Katrina (2005) smashed all records by  doubling the cost of the 1988 drought and destroying the record for hurricane cost set by Andrew in  1992. Besides cost, the deadliest US natural disaster ever was the Galveston Hurricane of 1900  which claimed an estimated 10,000 lives. Outside of the US, the cost of recovery is smaller but the  death toll is significantly higher. In 2008,  Cyclone Nargis  slammed into Myanmar (Burma) and  claimed approximately 140,000 lives. In this lesson, we will focus first on identifying the deadly and destructive parts of the hurricane.  Then we will focus on the science behind storm surge. Links to images you saw in the video Before  and  after  images from Camile NHC Storm Surge Page  (great resource)  In the image below, you can see how the shape of the coastline impacts storm surge  intensity
Notes Storm Surge A rise in sea level due primarily to wind-blown water Only affects the coastline Does not resemble a tidal wave from a tsunami Made worse with high tide Shape of the coastline may enhance the surge In recent hurricanes (in the past decade), storm surge has been the deadlies part of the  hurricane. Inland Flooding Hurricanes can drop 10" to 50+" of rain
Causes widespread damage Made worse in mountainous regions ( Hurricane Mitch 1998 ) Biggest Killer with respect to hurricanes between 1970-1999) High Winds Can gust over 200 mph (rare though) Primarily confined to the eyewall Embedded Tornadoes Some hurricanes spawn dozens while other produce none at all difficult to distinguish tornado damage from hurricane damage Typically very weak (EF-0 to EF-1 damage) More on Storm Surge (Note: I recorded this long  before Hurricane Sandy (2012))
2. Inland Flooding (Freshwater Flooding) Inland Flooding (Freshwater Flooding) If you were to ask anyone, "What is the most deadly part of a hurricane?" the most likely responses 

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture