Livescopesiteindian removal the trail of

This preview shows page 15 - 17 out of 30 pages.

direct=true&db=f5h&AN=17910229&site=eds-live&scope=site">Indian Removal & the Trail of  Tears.</A> Database: MasterFILE Premier Indian Removal & the Trail of Tears  The initial colonization of the North American continent brought with it continual conflict between white settlers and Native  Americans. Populated areas quickly became overcrowded,  leaving the influx of new arrivals to settle outlying lands that  belonged to the local Indian tribes, who were often unwilling to  move. The United States government created many  oppressive, anti-Indian land-reform policies throughout the  years between the War of 1812 and the Civil War. The goal of  such government action was to open up the lands east of the  Mississippi River for white settlers by evicting the five Indian  tribes of the East Coast and relocating them to the dry, arid  lands in the west. The government's involvement in forced exile of the Cherokee and other tribes became known as the Trail of  Tears, and reached its peak under the direction of President  Andrew Jackson. For years the United States coerced, 
manipulated and bullied the tribes of the Seminole, Choctaw,  Creek, Cherokee and Chickasaw into relinquishing their tribal  grounds. Although the tribes that were unwilling to give up their homes fought back against the federal government, their  valiant efforts to maintain their lands and dignity were  unsuccessful. Jackson and the Indians The Proclamation of 1763 forced colonists to remain east of  the Appalachian Mountains, and all land west of this natural  barrier was reserved for Native Americans. However, by the  1800's, American cities were growing and the settlers were  itching to move westward onto Native American lands. Because of the settlers' desire for more land, tensions grew  between Native Americans and European Americans as Native American tribes were forced from their homes. The first  Seminole War of 1817-1819, fought in the territory of Florida,  demonstrated the volatile nature of the relationship between  the US government and Native American tribes. General  Andrew Jackson marched on Florida in an effort to gain  possession of the lands from the Spanish and Indian tribes.  The Seminole tribe was determined to hold their ground, but  the Jackson's forces were too strong. His troops forcibly took a  Seminole-held fort at Prospect Bluff, Florida, and continued  their march, attacking and conquering a Seminole village led  by Chief Neamathla.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture