The specificity principle states that the physiologic adaptations to exercise

The specificity principle states that the physiologic

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The specificity principle states that the physiologic adaptations to exercise are specific to the type of exercise performed.
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Rate of progression Rate of progression in an exercise program depends on individual’s health status, physical fitness, training responses, and exercise program goals. Progression can consist of increasing any of the components of the FITT principle of Ex R x as tolerated An increase in exercise time/duration per session of 5–10 min every 1–2 wk over the first 4–6 wk of an exercise training program is reasonable for the average adult. After the individual has been exercising regularly for at least 1 month, volume is increased over the next 4–8 months: longer for older adults and very deconditioned individuals Typical goal to meet recommended the Guidelines.
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Initiation Stage Must allow time for adaptation to occur Often at lower intensity and duration compared to later stages, especially in sedentary individuals Goal is to limit extreme fatigue and muscle soreness. Progression stage Initiate the progressive overload principle Indicators of progression that is too rapid include the following: Failure to complete an exercise session Lack of normal interest in training Increased HR or RPE at the same rate of external work Increase in minor aches and pains Do not increase frequency, intensity, and duration in any single week. Advance volume ~10%. Maintenance stage Goal is long-term maintenance. Introduce new activities to avoid boredom or monotony
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How long would someone need to exercise to each day (5 days/wk) achieve 8KKW given the following variables? Male, 30 yrs old Body weight = 100 kg Treadmill walking – speed = 5mph; grade = 5% Hint: Start with VO 2 (ml/kg/min)
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Example including volume and intensity??
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The health benefits of enhancing muscular fitness (the functional parameters of muscle strength, endurance, and power) are well established. Higher levels of muscular strength are associated with a significantly better cardiometabolic risk factor profile (Chpt 10 GETP), lower risk of all cause mortality, fewer CVD events, lower risk of developing physical function limitations, and lower risk for nonfatal disease. Artero, et al. JCRP , 2012
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Although muscular power is important for athletic events, muscular strength and endurance are of greater importance in a general training regimen focusing on health/fitness outcomes for young and middle-aged adults. In addition to focusing on muscular strength and endurance, older adults (≥65 yr) may benefit from power training because this element of muscle fitness declines most rapidly with aging and insufficient power has been associated with a greater risk of accidental falls.
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For adults of all ages, the goals of a health-related resistance training program should be to: 1. make activities of daily living (ADL) ( e.g. , stair climbing, carrying bags of groceries) less stressful physiologically 2. effectively manage, attenuate, and even prevent chronic diseases and health conditions such as osteoporosis, Type 2 diabetes mellitus, and obesity.
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  • Fall '09
  • MICHEALWELSCH
  • strength training, Physical exercise, Weight training, METS

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