Satisfaction thargad and verbeurgt 1998

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satisfaction (Thargad and Verbeurgt 1998)   Psychologically, decision as coherence is very different from decision as calculation. Calculations  are conscious and explicit, d isp layable to everyone on pencil and paper. In contrast, if coherence  maximization in human brains is similar to what happens in the artificial neural networks, then  assessment of coherence is a process not accessible to consciousness. What comes to the  consciousness is only the realization that a particular action is the one I want to perform. Hence  deliberative coherence is closer to the intuition model of decision making than to calculation model.  Coherence is maximized not by an explicit, consciously accessible calculation but by an  unconscious process whose output is the intuition that one action is preferable to others. There is  however, a major difference between the deliberative coherence account of decision-making and the intuition account. Intuitions about what to do are usually emotional, involving feelings that one action  is a good thing to do and that alternatives are bad things to do.   a)      Emotional Coherence  
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In the theory of coherence, elements have the epistemic status of being accepted or rejected. In  addition to acceptability, elements in coherence systems have an emotional valence, which can be  positive or negative. Depending on the nature of what the elements represent, the valence of an  element can indicate likability, desirability, or other positive or negative attitude. For example, the  valence of mother Theresa for most people is highly positive, while the valence of Adolf Hitler is  highly negative.   Just as elements are related to each other by the positive and negative deliberative constrains, so  they also can be related by positive and negative valence constraints. Some elements have intrinsic  positive and negative valences, for example, pleasure and pain. Other elements can acquire  valences by virtue of their connections with elements that have intrinsic valences. For example if one has a positive association between the concepts of dentist and pain, where pain has an intrinsic  negative valence, then dentist can acquire a negative valence. However, just as the acceptability of  an element depends on the acceptability of the elements that constrain it, so the valence of an  element depends on the valences of all the elements that constrain it.
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