Thinking among them scientific thinking mathematical

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thinking, among them: scientific thinking, mathematical thinking, dialectical thinking, anthropological  thinking, economic thinking, moral thinking, and philosophical thinking. As a way of thinking, Critical thinking has two components: a set of skills to process and generate information and beliefs, and the habit, based on intellectual commitment, of using those skills to guide behaviour. It is thus to be contrasted with: the mere acquisition and retention of information alone, (because it involves a particular  way in which information is sought and treated,) the mere possession of a set of skills, (because it involves the continual use of them,) and the mere use of those skills ("as an exercise") without acceptance of their result   SUBTOPIC 3: Characteristics and Essential aspects of Critical and Creative Thinking Walde (1995) identifies 8 (Eight) characteristics of Critical and creative thinking which includes: asking questions defining a problem examining evidence  analyzing assumptions and biases  avoiding emotional reasoning  avoiding oversimplification  considering other interpretations and  tolerating ambiguity. Dealing with ambiguity is also seen by Strohm & Baukus (1995) as an essential part of Critical  thinking. Ambiguity and doubt serve a critical-thinking function and are a necessary and even a  productive part of the process.           b) Essential Aspects of Critical and Creative thinking In the book,  Critical thinking , Beyer explains what he sees as essential aspects of Critical thinking.  They include: D isp ositions:   Critical thinkers are sceptical, open-minded, value fair-mindedness, respect  evidence and reasoning, respect clarity and precision, look at different points of view, and  will change positions when reason leads them to do so.  
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Criteria:  To think critically, must apply criteria. Need to have conditions that must be met  for something to be judged as believable. Although the argument can be made that each  subject area has different criteria, some standards apply to all subjects. "... an assertion  must... be based on relevant, accurate facts; based on credible sources; precise; unbiased;  free from logical fallacies; logically consistent; and strongly reasoned" (p. 12).   Argument:  Is a statement or proposition with supporting evidence. Critical thinking  involves identifying, evaluating, and constructing arguments.
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  • Fall '16
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