Prevent by keeping CD4 count up mycobacterium avium complex MAC Group of

Prevent by keeping cd4 count up mycobacterium avium

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-Prevent by keeping CD4 count upmycobacterium avium complex (MAC)-Group of bacteria r/t tuberculosis -Germs common in food, water, soil-Almost everybody has them in their bodies-Usually causes problems after HIV becomes AIDS and CD4 cell count gets Infect on part of body (lungs, bone, intestines)–localized &disseminated infection-High fever/chills, night sweats, abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, fatigue, swollen glands,MAC bacteria may be found in your blood, urine, sputum, bone marrow, tissue-Blood tests (serum alkaline phosphatase elevated)-CT scan of chest/abdomen- visualize issues with
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lower than 50anemia-Serious infections: blood infections, hepatitis, pneumonialymph nodes, liver, spleen*Will treat MAC beforestart ART d/t possible problems when you also take drugs to treat HIVcytomegalovirus (CMV)-Spreads by direct contact of body fluids including breastfeeding, blood transfusions, organ transplants, sexual contact-Belongs to herpes virus family-May remain dormant for life-Fever, fatigueCan cause serious disease in weakened immune system- retinitis, hepatitis, colitis, PNA, encephalitis-ART treatment6.Mechanisms of antibiotic resistanceoOccurs when bacteria change in a way that reduces the effectiveness. Bacteria survive and continue to multiply, causing more harm7.Vaccines in preventing infectious disease.oPurpose of vaccination is to induce active immunologic protection before exposure to the risks of infection, produces large number of memory cells, and a sustained protective secondary immune responseoMay need booster injections to maintain protection throughout lifeoNeed desired protective immune response (ie: antibody, T cell), identifying the appropriate antigen to induce that response (ie: immune responses against some antigens on an infectious agent are ineffective or even increase the risk for infection), determining the most effective route of administration, optimizing the number and timing of vaccine doses to induce protective immunity in a large proportion of the at-risk population
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