Powers of the President and Congress Through Article I section 8 of the

Powers of the president and congress through article

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Powers of the President and Congress Through Article I section 8 of the constitution congress has its most important power which is the ability to create laws. When a bill or any proposed law is up for a vote it can only be passed if the House of Representatives and the Senate both approve it in the same form. Congress also has the powers to “declare war, coin money, raise an army and navy, regulate
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Figures title: 3 commerce, establish rules of immigration and naturalization, and establish the federal courts and their jurisdictions ("The Powers of Congress", 2018). According to Article II of the constitution, the president has the power to commission officers of the armed forces, grant reprieves, and pardons, convene Congress in special sessions, wield executive power, receive ambassadors, and ensure that laws are being executed correctly. One of the aforementioned executive powers the president has is to veto a law or bill though even if that happens congress can overturn the veto with a two-thirds vote. Checks and Balances The founding fathers of the US were wise to set up a form of checks and balances built into the constitution to ensure no branch of government could garner too much power and guard against tyranny. “If men were angels, no government would be necessary,” James Madison wrote in the Federalist Papers , of the necessity for checks and balances. “In framing a government which is to be administered by men over men, the great difficulty is this: You must first enable the government to control the governed; and in the next place, oblige it to control itself.” (History.com Editors, 2017).
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