To avoid ponding issues the floor surface should be

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  • AA 1
  • SC12008230
  • 225

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To avoid ponding issues, the floor surface should be either even (with no dips) and horizontal, or even and graded to allow water to fall to a drainage point. (d) to the extent that is practicable, be unable to provide harbourage for pests. The floor must contain no places where pests such as cockroaches could harbour and breed. For example, vinyl sheeting must be firmly attached to the surface beneath to prevent pests harbouring under the sheeting. Floors in poor condition (e.g. broken tiling with crevices or torn and lifted vinyl sheeting) might provide harbourage for pests. The term ‘to the extent that it is practicable’ recognises that it could be difficult to exclude every crack or crevice in a floor. As with other clauses in this standard, the general intent is to protect food safety and suitability. Note that floors must be maintained in a good condition under Standard 3.2.2 subclause 21(1). 10(3) The following floors do not have to comply with subclause (2): (a) floors of temporary food premises, including ground surfaces, that are unlikely to pose any risk of contamination of food handled at the food premises; and This exemption to the requirements for floors in 10(2) allows businesses using a temporary food premises to use the existing ground surface, such as grass, concrete, paving or dirt, if the surface does not present a food safety hazard (e.g. the selling of packaged foods or food directly from a barbecue at temporary events such as fetes and markets).
123 STANDARD 3.2.3 AUSTRALIA NEW ZEALAND FOOD STANDARDS CODE CHAPTER 3 (AUSTRALIA ONLY) STANDARD 3.2.3 FOOD STANDARDS AUSTRALIA NEW ZEALAND SAFE FOOD AUSTRALIA If the ground surface is unsuitable, floors that do not comply with subclause 10(2) may be installed in temporary premises, provided they do not pose a food safety hazard. Examples of floors that may be suitable are groundsheets and sealed timber boards. (b) floors of food premises that are unlikely to pose any risk of contamination of food handled at the food premises provided the food business has obtained the approval in writing of the appropriate enforcement agency for their use. Food premises other than temporary may be exempt from the requirements for floors in 10(2) if the floor is unlikely to pose a risk to food safety based on the food handling activities of the business or history of use (e.g. dirt floors used traditionally in wineries). A written exemption must be obtained from the enforcement agency. Example Exemption for floor for storage purposes A grocery store has a storeroom with an unsealed timber floor. Since the unsealed material could absorb grease, food particles and water, the floor could pose a risk of contaminating exposed food. The proprietor is granted written approval to store only packaged, non-perishable food in that storeroom, provided the floor is kept clean, free of pests and maintained in good order.

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