Check doors windows heating living area chair heights

This preview shows page 36 - 38 out of 61 pages.

Check doors, windows, heating Living area Chair heights Protruding furniture Kitchen Floor Flammable material Taps Electrical and gas equipment Kettle Poisons Cupboards Drainage in floor Electrical connections away from possible contact with water or heating sources Bathroom Floor Hot water thermostat control Poisons Toilet height Toilet paper visible Laundry Storage of poisons Drainage Electrical connections away from possible contact with water Bedroom Bed height Chair in bedroom for dressing Wandering Identification bracelet Identification and emergency contact details in wallet Bell on door, window and gate *Adapted from This link does not work Principles of problem solving 26 Solving problems involves continual assessment and planning. The following principles should guide any changes to the environment of a person with dementia: Involve the person with dementia in identifying problems and deciding on changes to their environment, where possible Ensure that modifications suit each individual Respond to specific problems. Do not introduce standard modifications Change as little as possible. Retain the familiar Build on strengths and maximise autonomy Try simple solutions first Ensure that modifications are home-like and dignified Changes should be age and culture appropriate Weigh up risks to achieve a balance between safety and autonomy Ensure that family, carers and workers have a safe working environment 26 Adapted from At home with dementia, NSW Department of Ageing, Disability and Home Care2011
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Learner Guide - Version 3 CHCAGE005 Page 37 of 61 ACCESS INFORMATION ABOUT THE PERSON’S REMINISCENCES AND ROUTINES WITH FAMILY AND CARERS Reminiscence This Is Your Life book a chronological history of the person with dementia can help with reminiscence and provides information for people who may interact with them can help carers coming in to the home or residential care facility get to know the person and their life a visual diary, similar to a family photo album includes: o letters o postcards o certificates o other memorabilia A large photo album with plastic protective sheets over each page which can withstand a lot of use. Each photo needs to be labelled to avoid putting the person with dementia on the spot with questions such as “Who is that?” It is best to limit the information on each page to one topic, and to have a maximum of two or three items on each page. The following list may help in getting a book started: Full name and preferred name Place and date of birth Photographs and name of mother, father, brothers and sisters Photographs of partner and wedding day Photographs, names and birthdays of children and grandchildren Photographs of family friends, relatives and pets Places lived in Schooldays Occupation and war service Hobbies and interests Favourite music

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